Tsarskoye Selo

Coordinates:59°43′24″N 30°24′57″E / 59.72333°N 30.41583°E / 59.72333; 30.41583

Tsarskoye Selo (Russian: Ца́рское Село́, IPA: [ˈtsarskəɪ sʲɪˈlo] (listen), "Tsar's Village") was the town containing a former residence of the Russian imperial family and visiting nobility, located 24 kilometers (15 mi) south from the center of Saint Petersburg.[1] The residence now forms part of the town of Pushkin. Tsarskoye Selo forms one of the World Heritage Site Saint Petersburg and Related Groups of Monuments.

The town bore the name Tsarskoe Selo until 1918, Detskoe Selo (Russian: Детское Село, lit.'Children's Village') between in the years 1918–1937, then Pushkin (Russian: Пушкин) from 1937 onwards.

History

The Alexander Palace, view of the corps de logis from the cour d'honneur

The area of Tsarskoye Selo, once part of Swedish Ingria, first became a Russian royal/imperial residence in the early 18th century as an estate of the Empress-consort Catherine (later Empress-regnant as Catherine I, r. 1725–1727), from whom the Catherine Palace takes its name. The Alexander Palace (built from 1792 onwards) originated as the home of Catherine the Great's grandson, the Grand Duke Alexander Pavlovich, who later became Emperor Alexander I (r. 1801–1825). After his abdication, Nicholas II and his family, were under house arrest here until 13 August 1917.[2]

The Royal Forestry School, perhaps the first such school in Russia, was founded in Tsarskoye Selo in 1803; it was moved to Saint Petersburg in 1811, to become the Imperial Forestry Institute.[3]

According to Robert K. Massie, "Tsarskoe Selo was a magnificent synbol, a supreme gesture, of the Russian autocracy. At the edge of the great St. Petersburg plain, fifteen miles south of the capital, a succession of Russian tsars and empresses had created an isolated, miniature world, as artificial and fantastic as a precisely ordered mechanical toy. Inside the park, monuments, obelisks and triumphal arches studded eight hundred acres of velvet green lawn. An artificial lake, big enough for small sailboats, could be emptied and filled like a bathtub. At one end of the lake stood a pink Turkish bath; not far off, a dazzling red-and-gold Chinese pagoda crowned an artificial hillock." The two palaces stood five hundred yards apart in the Imperial Park. "Outside the palace gates, Tsarskoe Selo, was an elegant provincial town..." The town included "The mansions of the aristocracy, lining the wide tree-shaded boulevard which led from the railway station to the gates of the Imperial Park..."[2]

Nickname for elite Soviet neighborhoods

In the Soviet Union the nickname "the Tsar's village" came to apply to blocks and small neighborhoods that housed the nomenklatura (Soviet elites). Their stores were better stocked, although they were still affected by Soviet-era shortages. The buildings in the neighborhoods were better designed, constructed and maintained.[4]

One such neighborhood, west of Moscow, contained less industry and more parks than any other neighborhood.[5]

Monuments

Catherine Palace, the Amber Room

Gallery

See also

  • Treaty of Tsarskoye Selo
  • Emperor railway station in Pushkin town
  • Adolphe Kegresse

References

  1. ^ Jabado, Salwa; Fodor's (2008). Fodor's Moscow and St. Petersburg. New York: Random House. p. 292. ISBN 978-1-4000-0717-2.
  2. ^ a b Massie, Robert (1967). Nicholas and Alexandria. New York: Ballantine Books. pp. 117–130. ISBN 9780345438317.
  3. ^ St. Petersburg Encyclopedia. Accessed: May 6, 2012.
  4. ^ Compare:Gessen, Masha (2017). The Future is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia. Granta Books. ISBN 9781783784011. Retrieved October 22, 2020. Under the Soviets [...] the name 'the Tsars' Village' began attaching itself to blocks and small neighborhoods that housed the Soviet elites.
    The stores here were better stocked, even though they were affected by the shortages. The buildings were better designed and constructed.
  5. ^ Masha Gessen, (2017). The Future Is History: How Totalitarianism Reclaimed Russia.

Further reading

  • King, Greg (2006). The Court of the Last Tsar (hardback). Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 978-0-471-72763-7.

External links

Media files used on this page

Sankt-Peterburg oldfoto 13635.jpg
Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), the Imperial "Benz". Behind the wheel sits chauffeur Adolf Kegress. Tsarskoye Selo, at the main entrance of the Great Catherine Palace. September 9, 1911.
TsarskoeSeloEmperorStationPostcard.jpeg
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Grot pavilion in Tsarskoe Selo.jpg
(c) Alex 'Florstein' Fedorov, CC BY-SA 4.0
This is a photo of a cultural heritage object in Russia, number:
Imperial Standard of the Emperor of Russia (1858–1917).svg
Author/Creator: This W3C-unspecified vector image was created with Inkscape., Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
Imperial Standard of the Emperor of Russia, used from 1858 to 1917.
Automobil mit Schneeraupe und vorne Skiern - CH-BAR - 3241597.jpg
Automobil mit Schneeraupe und vorne Skiern
Darin: Motorwagen Dienst
Original: Negativ; Glasplatte; Silberbromid; 13x18cm
Signatur: CH-BAR#E27#1000/721#14095#5597*
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Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), "Grand Caprice" in Alexander Park.
Catherine Palace - Great Hall 01.jpg
Author/Creator: Andrey Korzun, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Tsarskoye Selo. The Catherine Palace, the Great Hall.
Царское Село. Екатерининский дворец 1.jpg
Author/Creator: Alexander2018, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Государственный художественно-архитектурный дворцово-парковый музей-заповедник 'Царское Село': Пушкин, Пушкинский район, Санкт-Петербург
Царское Село. Александровский дворец 2.jpg
Author/Creator: Alexander2018, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Государственный художественно-архитектурный дворцово-парковый музей-заповедник 'Царское Село': Пушкин, Пушкинский район, Санкт-Петербург
PalacioDeAlejandroResidenciaDelZarTsarkoieSelo--fallofromanoffsh00londrich.jpg
El palacio de Alejandro, residencia privada del zar en Tsárskoye Seló.
Catherine - Parc - Palladio (01).jpg
Author/Creator: Concierge.2C, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
This is a photo of a cultural heritage object in Russia, number:
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Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), "Shapel" in Alexander Park.
Andrey Zeest - Amber Room 2 (autochrome).jpg
Tsarskoye Selo, Catherine Palace. The Amber Room in 1917. Autochromes of Andrei Andreyevich Zeest are made in June-August 1917. Interiors photographing of Tsarskoye Selo was conducted on behalf of G. K. Lukomsky (chairman of the Commission for acceptance and registration estate management of the Tsarskoye Selo palace; the commission formed by the Provisional Government). In the Amber Room at the time was placed the model of the monument Friedrich the Great.
Sankt-Peterburg oldfoto 13725.jpg
Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), Large Chinese Bridge in Alexander Park.
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Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), Stages of the Jubilee Exhibition for the 200th anniversary of Tsarskoye Selo.
Catherine Palace & Cameron Gallery (Premazzi).jpg
Catherine Palace, with the Cameron Gallery visible on the right and the Platon Zubov apartments in the background. The Catherine Palace, located at Tsarskoe Selo, was the summer residence of the Russian imperial family.
Galerie Cameron du Palais de Catherine full size.jpg
Author/Creator: Jim G, Licence: CC BY 2.0

Tsarskoye Selo, once known as the Czar’s Village or Pushkin, is approximately 17 miles south of the city of St. Petersburg and is the site of Catherine’s Palace. Built between 1719-1723 and restored many times, it has a stunning aqua colored façade, decorated with statues, gold and white ornaments and topped with gold onion domes. Inside is an immense collection of art work and furnishings. This, as with all of the palaces in the area, was heavily damaged by retreating German forces, but is now almost completely restored.

See set comments for <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimg944/sets/72157594534792118/comments">“St. Petersburg Overview & History”</a>.
Sankt-Peterburg oldfoto 13619.jpg
Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), Farm outbuilding with a tower in Alexander Park.
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Tsarskoye Selo (Russia), Fire in the Catherine Palace.
Ru Tsarskoye Selo.ogg
Author/Creator: Denghu, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
"Tsarskoye Selo" pronounced by a native speaker of Russian (Moscow accent)