Timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic

The timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic lists the articles containing the chronology and epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2,[1] the virus that causes the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and is responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

The first human cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan, People's Republic of China, in December 2019.[2] The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020.[3][4][5] At the current stage of the pandemic (March 2022), it is not possible to conclusively determine precisely how humans in mainland China were initially or previously infected with the virus, called SARS-CoV-2.[6] Furthermore, some developments may become known or fully understood only in retrospect.

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Interactive map of confirmed COVID-19 cases per million people.

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In November 2020, the United States became the first country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In December 2020, India became the second country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In February 2021, Brazil became the third country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In November 2021, the United Kingdom became the fourth country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. In December 2021, Russia became the fifth country to have at least ten million confirmed cases. At the beginning of 2022, France joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. More than a week later, Turkey joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. Then, Italy joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. At the beginning of February 2022, Germany and Spain joined the list of countries with at least ten million cases. The United States was also the only country to have at least ten million confirmed cases in November and December 2020. As of March 2022, ten countries have at least ten million confirmed cases, incl. the United States, India, Brazil, France, the United Kingdom, Russia, Germany, Turkey, Italy and Spain.

In December 2019 and January 2020, China was the only country to have at least one confirmed case. Thailand was the only country to have at least one confirmed case outside China in January 2020. The United States and India became first two countries with at least ten million confirmed cases in late 2020. Brazil, the United Kingdom and Russia joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases in 2021. France, Germany, Turkey, Italy and Spain later joined the list of countries with at least ten million confirmed cases. Six (60% or three fifths) of the ten countries that have at least ten million confirmed cases are in Europe, incl. France and the United Kingdom.

Until March 2020, China had the largest number of confirmed cases. In March 2020, the United States and Italy began to have the largest numbers of confirmed cases by overtaking China. Later on, in April 2020, the United Kingdom became one of the countries to have the largest numbers of confirmed cases by overtaking China. The United States has had the largest number of confirmed cases since March 2020. As of March 2022, all 50 states in the United States, as well as Washington, D.C., have more confirmed cases than China, with California having the largest number of confirmed cases. Vermont was the last and most recent state in the United States to overtake China in terms of the number of confirmed cases. 27 of the 50 states in the United States have at least a million confirmed cases. The United States is the country in North America with the highest number of confirmed cases. It is also the only country in North America with at least ten million confirmed cases. France is the country in Europe with the highest number of confirmed cases. The United Kingdom is the country in Europe with the second highest number of confirmed cases.

In August 2021, Japan became the first country in East Asia with at least a million confirmed cases. Several months later, in February 2022, South Korea became the second country in East Asia with at least a million confirmed cases. Japan was also the only country in East Asia with at least a million confirmed cases for several months, between August 2021 and February 2022. As of March 2022, two countries in East Asia have at least a million confirmed cases, incl. Japan and South Korea.

Until October 2020, China was the country in East Asia with the largest number of confirmed cases. In October 2020, Japan became the country in East Asia with the largest number of confirmed cases by overtaking China. A few months later, at the beginning of March 2021, South Korea became the country in East Asia with the second largest number of confirmed cases by overtaking China. In June 2021, Mongolia became the country in East Asia with the third largest number of confirmed cases by overtaking China. Japan has been the country in East Asia with the largest number of confirmed cases since October 2020. As of March 2022, ten prefectures in Japan have more confirmed cases than China, with Tokyo having the largest number of confirmed cases. Kyoto was the most recent prefecture in Japan to overtake China in terms of the number of confirmed cases. 11 of the 47 prefectures in Japan have at least 100,000 confirmed cases. Tokyo is the only prefecture in Japan with at least a million confirmed cases. In February 2022, Japan joined the list of 20 countries with the most confirmed cases. Later on, South Korea joined the list of 40 countries with the most confirmed cases. At the beginning of March 2022, South Korea joined the list of 30 countries with the most confirmed cases on the first anniversary of the day when it overtook China in terms of the number of confirmed cases. In March 2022, South Korea joined the list of 20 countries with the most confirmed cases.

Worldwide timelines by month and year

The 2019 and January 2020 timeline articles include the initial responses as subsections, and more comprehensive timelines by nation-state are listed below this section.

Cases
Cases
Deaths
Deaths

The following are the timelines of the COVID-19 pandemic respectively in:

Responses

The following are responses to the COVID-19 pandemic respectively in:

Timeline by country

Some of the timelines listed below also contain responses. The following are the timeline of the COVID-19 pandemic in:

Worldwide cases by month and year

The following are COVID-19 pandemic cases in:

References

  1. ^ "Coronavirus". www.who.int. Retrieved 27 January 2020.
  2. ^ Page, Jeremy; Hinshaw, Drew; McKay, Betsy (26 February 2021). "In Hunt for Covid-19 Origin, Patient Zero Points to Second Wuhan Market - The man with the first confirmed infection of the new coronavirus told the WHO team that his parents had shopped there". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  3. ^ "Statement on the second meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV)". World Health Organization (WHO). 30 January 2020. Archived from the original on 31 January 2020. Retrieved 30 January 2020.
  4. ^ "WHO Director-General's opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19—11 March 2020". World Health Organization. 11 March 2020. Retrieved 11 March 2020.
  5. ^ Ramin Zibaseresht (14 April 2020). "How to Respond to the Ongoing Pandemic Outbreak of the Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)". European Journal of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Retrieved 14 April 2020.
  6. ^ WHO. "Q&A on coronaviruses (COVID-19)". World Health Organization. Retrieved 6 April 2020.

External links

Media files used on this page

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SARS-CoV-2 logo in Wikimedia colors
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The rod of Asclepius as depicted in the WHO logo.
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Author/Creator: User:FoeNyx © 2004 (artistic illustration), Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
VIH - HIV / SIDA - AIDS viruses.
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