Suffolk County, Massachusetts

Suffolk County
Suffolk County Courthouse
Official seal of Suffolk County
Map of Massachusetts highlighting Suffolk County
Location within the U.S. state of Massachusetts
Map of the United States highlighting Massachusetts
Massachusetts's location within the U.S.
Coordinates:42°20′06″N 71°04′25″W / 42.334949°N 71.073494°W / 42.334949; -71.073494
Country United States
State Massachusetts
FoundedMay 10, 1643
Named forSuffolk
SeatBoston
Largest cityBoston
Area
 • Total120 sq mi (300 km2)
 • Land58.15 sq mi (150.6 km2)
 • Water62 sq mi (160 km2)  52%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total797,936 Increase
 • Density13,698/sq mi (5,289/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional districts5th, 7th, 8th

Suffolk County is located in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 797,936,[1] making it the fourth-most populous county in Massachusetts.[2] The county comprises the cities of Boston, Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop.[3] The traditional county seat is Boston, the state capital and the largest city in Massachusetts.[4] The county government was abolished in 1999, and so Suffolk County today functions only as an administrative subdivision of state government and a set of communities grouped together for some statistical purposes. Suffolk County is located at the core of the Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH Metropolitan Statistical Area as well as the greater Boston-Worcester-Providence, MA-RI-NH-CT Combined Statistical Area.

History

Old Suffolk County Courthouse 1810-1841

The county was created by the Massachusetts General Court on May 10, 1643, when it was ordered "that the whole plantation within this jurisdiction be divided into four shires". Suffolk initially contained Boston, Roxbury, Dorchester, Dedham, Braintree, Weymouth, and Hingham.[5] The county was named after Suffolk, England, which means "southern folk."[6]

In 1731, the extreme western portions of Suffolk County, which included Mendon and Uxbridge, were split off to become part of Worcester County. In 1793, most of the original Suffolk County (including Milton) except for Boston, Chelsea, Hingham, and Hull (which remained in Suffolk) split off and became Norfolk County. Hingham and Hull would leave Suffolk County and join Plymouth County in 1803.[7] Revere was set off from Chelsea and incorporated in 1846 and Winthrop was set off from Revere and incorporated in 1852. In the late 19th century and early 20th century, Boston annexed several adjacent cities and towns including Hyde Park, Roxbury, West Roxbury, and Dorchester from Norfolk County and Charlestown and Brighton from Middlesex County, resulting in an enlargement of Suffolk County.

Government and politics

Like an increasing number of Massachusetts counties, Suffolk County exists today only as a historical geographic region, and has no county government.[8] All former county functions were assumed by state agencies in 1999. The sheriff, district attorney, and some other regional officials with specific duties are still elected locally to perform duties within the county region, but there is no county council, executives or commissioners. Immediately prior to the abolition of county government, the authority of the Suffolk County Commission had for many years been exercised by the Boston City Council, even though three communities in the county are not part of the city. However, communities are now granted the right to form their own regional compacts for sharing services.[9]

Politically speaking, Suffolk County supports the Democratic Party overwhelmingly. No Republican presidential candidate has won there since Calvin Coolidge in 1924. In 2012 Barack Obama received 77.4% of the vote, compared to 20.8% for former governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney. In the 2014 gubernatorial election, Martha Coakley carried the county by a 32.4% margin, while losing the election statewide by 48.4 to 46.5%. In 2020, Joe Biden won the county by the largest margin of any presidential candidate since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964, and was the first candidate since then to win more than 80% of the vote in the county.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 17, 2018[10]
PartyNumber of votersPercentage
Democratic235,43649.90%
Republican28,0335.94%
Unenrolled202,51042.92%
Minor Parties5,8501.24%
Total471,829100%
United States presidential election results for Suffolk County, Massachusetts[11]
YearRepublicanDemocraticThird party
No. %No. %No. %
202058,61317.47%270,52280.64%6,3271.89%
201650,42116.09%245,75178.44%17,1115.46%
201259,99920.75%223,89677.45%5,2031.80%
200857,19421.24%207,12876.94%4,9001.82%
200454,92322.82%182,59275.88%3,1301.30%
200044,44120.48%154,88871.38%17,6718.14%
199639,75319.94%145,58673.01%14,0537.05%
199251,37823.43%132,92160.62%34,97415.95%
198877,13734.37%143,67764.02%3,5961.60%
198491,56337.37%152,56862.27%8660.35%
198073,27133.89%113,41652.46%29,52013.65%
197680,62334.70%142,01061.11%9,7394.19%
197285,27233.73%166,25065.76%1,2990.51%
196848,95218.20%203,40675.62%16,6196.18%
196440,25113.50%257,16186.22%8420.28%
196085,75025.25%252,82374.44%1,0440.31%
1956162,83645.78%191,24553.77%1,6050.45%
1952162,14740.05%240,95759.51%1,7750.44%
1948105,67127.44%265,61168.98%13,7853.58%
1944139,28537.19%234,47562.61%7270.19%
1940138,57536.07%243,23363.32%2,3370.61%
193696,41827.55%223,73263.92%29,8608.53%
193288,73729.97%198,79267.14%8,5432.89%
192899,39232.47%204,60366.84%2,1350.70%
1924104,65847.14%78,70235.45%38,63317.40%
1920108,08958.08%67,55236.30%10,4575.62%
191642,49240.03%61,04757.51%2,6092.46%
191224,17924.71%46,05947.07%27,61328.22%
190846,33748.50%43,77345.82%5,4295.68%
190443,68144.14%51,71452.26%3,5693.61%
190040,95144.82%47,53452.03%2,8803.15%
189653,63359.89%31,74435.45%4,1744.66%
189235,30443.38%44,50454.68%1,5841.95%
188831,19144.15%38,54054.55%9211.30%
188423,28336.85%34,62154.80%5,2788.35%
188028,34649.21%28,86150.10%3960.69%
187622,83247.49%25,10152.21%1410.29%


Law enforcement

The Suffolk County Sheriff's Department's primary responsibility is oversight of the Nashua Street Jail and the South Bay House of Correction. These were built in the 1990s to replace the historic Charles Street Jail and Deer Island Prison, respectively. The Suffolk County Sheriff's Department was among those named in a 2020 WBUR report about the neglect of inmates with medical conditions in Massachusetts prisons leading to their deaths.[12]

Several notable figures in Massachusetts history were once the sheriff of Suffolk County:[13]

  • Joseph Hall (1818–1825)
  • Charles Pinckney Sumner (1825–1839)
  • John M. Clark (1855–1883)
  • John A. Keliher (1917–1938)
  • John F. Dowd (1938–1939)
  • Frederick R. Sullivan (1939–1968)
  • John W. Sears (1968–1969)
  • Thomas S. Eisenstadt (1969–1977)
  • Dennis J. Kearney (1977–1987)
  • Robert Rufo (1987–1996)
  • Andrea Cabral (2002–2013)
  • Steven W. Tompkins (2013–present)

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 120 square miles (310 km2), of which 58 square miles (150 km2) is land and 62 square miles (160 km2) (52%) is water.[14] It is the second-smallest county in Massachusetts by land area and smallest by total area.

Adjacent counties

Suffolk County has no land border with Plymouth County to its southeast, but the two counties share a water boundary in the middle of Massachusetts Bay.

National protected areas

Major highways

  • I-90 / Mass Pike
  • I-93
  • US 1
  • US 20
  • Route 1A
  • Route 9
  • Route 16
  • Route 28
  • Route 30
  • Route 60
  • Route 99
  • Route 107
  • Route 145
  • Route 203

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
179044,865
180028,015−37.6%
181034,38122.7%
182043,94027.8%
183062,16341.5%
184095,77354.1%
1850144,51750.9%
1860192,70033.3%
1870270,80240.5%
1880387,92743.3%
1890484,78025.0%
1900611,41726.1%
1910731,38819.6%
1920835,52214.2%
1930879,5365.3%
1940863,248−1.9%
1950896,6153.9%
1960791,329−11.7%
1970735,190−7.1%
1980650,142−11.6%
1990663,9062.1%
2000689,8073.9%
2010722,0234.7%
2020797,93610.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1790-1960[16] 1900-1990[17]
1990-2000[18] 2010-2020[19][20]

Of the 292,767 households, 24.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 27.1% were married couples living together, 16.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 52.0% were non-families, and 36.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 3.11. The median age was 31.5 years.[21]

The median income for a household in the county was $50,597 and the median income for a family was $58,127. Males had a median income of $48,887 versus $43,658 for females. The per capita income for the county was $30,720. About 15.7% of families and 20.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.1% of those under age 18 and 19.1% of those age 65 or over.[22]

Suffolk County Racial Breakdown of Population (2017)[23][24]
RacePercentage of
Suffolk County
population
Percentage of
Massachusetts
population
Percentage of
United States
population
County-to-State
Difference
County-to-USA
Difference
White61.7%81.3%76.6%–19.6%–14.9%
White (Non-Hispanic)45.4%72.1%60.7%–26.7%–15.3%
Black24.9%8.8%13.4%+16.1%+11.5%
Hispanic22.9%11.9%18.1%+11.0%+4.8%
Asian9.1%6.9%5.8%+2.2%+3.3%
Native Americans/Hawaiians0.9%0.6%1.5%+0.3%–0.6%
Two or more races3.4%2.4%2.7%+1.0%+0.7%

Ancestry

According to the 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates, the largest ancestry groups in Suffolk County, Massachusetts are:[25][26]

AncestryPercentage of
Suffolk County
population
Percentage of
Massachusetts
population
Percentage of
United States
population
County-to-State
Difference
County-to-USA
Difference
Irish13.73%21.16%10.39%–7.42%+3.35%
Italian9.50%13.19%5.39%–3.69%+7.80%
West Indian6.05%1.96%0.90%+4.09%+1.05%
Puerto Rican5.32%4.52%1.66%+0.80%+3.66%
English4.32%9.77%7.67%–5.45%–3.35%
German4.21%6.00%14.40%–1.79%–10.19%
Chinese4.02%2.28%1.24%+1.74%+2.78%
American3.96%4.26%6.89%–0.30%–2.93%
Sub-Saharan African3.78%2.00%1.01%+1.78%+2.76%
Haitian3.13%1.15%0.31%+1.98%+2.82%
Polish2.41%4.67%2.93%–2.26%–0.53%
French2.01%6.82%2.56%–4.81%–0.55%
Cape Verdean1.99%0.97%0.03%+1.02%+1.96%
Vietnamese1.61%0.69%0.54%+0.92%+1.07%
Russian1.56%1.65%0.88%–0.08%+0.69%
Arab1.54%1.10%0.59%+0.44%+0.95%
Jamaican1.47%0.44%0.34%+1.03%+1.12%
Scottish1.27%2.28%1.71%–1.02%–0.45%
Asian Indian1.22%1.39%1.09%–0.17%+0.13%
Mexican1.18%0.67%11.96%+0.51%–10.78%
French Canadian1.19%3.91%0.65%–2.72%+0.53%

Demographic breakdown by town

Income

Data is from the 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.[27][28][29]

RankTownArea (land)Per capita
income
Median
household
income
Median
family
income
PopulationNumber of
households
1WinthropCity2.0 sq mi (5.2 km2)$36,624$61,744$81,64717,4307,356
MassachusettsState$35,051$65,981$83,3716,512,2272,522,409
2BostonCity48.42 sq mi (125.41 km2)$33,158$51,739$61,035609,942247,621
Suffolk CountyCounty$32,034$51,638$60,342713,089286,437
United StatesCountry$27,915$52,762$64,293306,603,772114,761,359
3RevereCity5.9 sq mi (15.3 km2)$25,085$50,592$58,34550,84519,425
4ChelseaCity2.2 sq mi (5.7 km2)$20,214$43,155$46,96734,87212,035

Communities

Map of Suffolk County showing (clockwise from bottom) Boston (red), Chelsea (yellow), Revere (green), and Winthrop (blue). Interior water features such as Boston Harbor are filled in by the color of the containing city.

Education

Each city has its own school district (including Boston Public Schools, Chelsea Public Schools, Revere Public Schools, and Winthrop Public Schools), which all follow municipal boundaries.[30]

Tertiary institutions in the county include:

Public library systems in the county include:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Suffolk County, Massachusetts". Census Bureau QuickFacts. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  2. ^ "USA/Massachusetts/Counties". The 192nd General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Archived from the original on July 28, 2022. Retrieved July 28, 2022.
  3. ^ "A Listing of Counties and the Cities and Towns Within". Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  5. ^ Davis, William T. Bench and Bar of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, p. 44. The Boston History Company, 1895.
  6. ^ Thomas Cox, Anthony Hall, Robert Morden, Magna Britannia Antiqua & Nova: Or, A New, Exact, and Comprehensive Survey of the Ancient and Present State of Great Britain, Volume 5, (Caesar Ward and Richard Chandler: London, 1738), pg. 171 (accessed on Google Book Search, June 22, 2008)
  7. ^ "History of Norfolk County - Norfolk County". www.norfolkcounty.org. Archived from the original on November 23, 2016. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  8. ^ "CIS: Historical Data Relating to the Incorporation of Counties in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts". www.sec.state.ma.us. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  9. ^ See also: League of Women Voters page on counties Archived April 21, 2004, at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 17, 2018" (PDF). Massachusetts Elections Division. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  11. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Archived from the original on March 23, 2018. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  12. ^ Christine Willmsen; Beth Healy (March 23, 2020). "When Inmates Die Of Poor Medical Care, Jails Often Keep It Secret". WBUR. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  13. ^ "History of Sheriffs". Suffolk County Sheriff's Office. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  14. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 14, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  15. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  17. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 28, 2015. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved September 16, 2014.
  19. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 24, 2011. Retrieved June 22, 2014.
  20. ^ "2020 Population and Housing State Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 14, 2021.
  21. ^ "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  22. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 12, 2016.
  23. ^ "Suffolk County, Massachusetts QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". census.gov.
  24. ^ "Massachusetts QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". census.gov.
  25. ^ "PEOPLE REPORTING ANCESTRY 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  26. ^ "ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  27. ^ "SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  28. ^ "ACS DEMOGRAPHIC AND HOUSING ESTIMATES 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  29. ^ "HOUSEHOLDS AND FAMILIES 2007-2011 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2013.
  30. ^ "2020 CENSUS - SCHOOL DISTRICT REFERENCE MAP: Suffolk County, MA" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2022. - Text list
  31. ^ "Chelsea Campus". Bunker Hill Community College. Retrieved July 22, 2022. 70 Everett Avenue Chelsea, MA 02150
  32. ^ "Public Library". City of Chelsea. Retrieved July 22, 2022.
  33. ^ "Home". Revere Public Library. Retrieved July 22, 2022.
  34. ^ "Home". Winthrop Public Library and Museum. Retrieved July 22, 2022.

External links

Coordinates:42°21′32″N 71°03′28″W / 42.35892°N 71.05781°W / 42.35892; -71.05781

Media files used on this page

Flag of the United States.svg
Author/Creator: unknown, Licence: PD
MA Route 16.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
MA Route 60.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
Suffolk County Courthouse Boston.jpg
(c) Swampyank at en.wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0
My 2008 photo of the Suffolk County Courthouse in Boston, MA, next to the SJC at Pemberton Square.
Map of Massachusetts highlighting Suffolk County.svg
This is a locator map showing Suffolk County in Massachusetts. For more information, see Commons:United States county locator maps.
Suffolk County.png
Author/Creator: unknown, Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
MA Route 203.svg
750 mm by 600 mm (30 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect rectangle, but all signs I have seen round the corners. Note: The specs specify Series D font for the numbers. However, that font does not fit when none of the characters is a one, and so those signs actually use Series C. This image is true to real signs, not the specs.
MA Route 9.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
MA Route 1A.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
Boston's Second City Hall 1841-1865.png
The Book of Boston: Fifty Years' Recollections of the New England Metropolis By Edwin Monroe Bacon Published by Book of Boston Co., 1916 page 48
MA Route 145.svg
750 mm by 600 mm (30 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect rectangle, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
Massachusetts in United States.svg
Author/Creator: TUBSEmail Silk.svg Gallery, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
Location of state of Massachusetts in United States in the United States
Seal of Suffolk County, Massachusetts.png
The Seal of Suffolk County, Massachusetts, the first seal ever adopted by a judicial court in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, this symbol first appeared in 1680. The version seen here is based loosely on one modernized by the Suffolk County Sheriff's Office (rarely used compared to the City of Boston's own seal) however it remains virtually unchanged in its subject matter and inscription from its 1680 counterpart (#4) The seal reads Sigil[lum] Comitat[us] Suffolciæ, Nova Anglia or literally "The Seal of the County of Suffolk, New England"
US 1.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
MA Route 99.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
MA Route 28.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
MA Route 30.svg
600 mm by 600 mm (24 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect square, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
MA Route 107.svg
750 mm by 600 mm (30 in by 24 in) Massachusetts Route shield, made to the specifications of the 1996 edition of Construction and Traffic Standard Details (sign M1-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border. The specs actually do not show the curve on the outside border, instead making it a perfect rectangle, but all signs I have seen round the corners.
Seal of Massachusetts.svg
Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts
US 20.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)