Princeton University Press

Princeton University Press
Princeton University Press logo.svg
Founded1905
FounderWhitney Darrow
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationPrinceton, New Jersey
DistributionIngram Publisher Services (Americas, Asia, Australia)
John Wiley & Sons (EMEA, India)
United Publishers Services (Japan)[1]
Publication typesBooks
Official websitepress.princeton.edu
Princeton University Press
Princeton University Press.jpg
Princeton University Press is located in Mercer County, New Jersey
Princeton University Press
Princeton University Press is located in New Jersey
Princeton University Press
Princeton University Press is located in the United States
Princeton University Press
Location41 William Street, Princeton, New Jersey
Coordinates40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694Coordinates:40°20′59.8″N 74°39′13.3″W / 40.349944°N 74.653694°W / 40.349944; -74.653694
Built1911
ArchitectErnest Flagg
Architectural styleCollegiate Gothic
Part ofPrinceton Historic District (ID75001143)
Added to NRHP27 June 1975

Princeton University Press is an independent publisher with close connections to Princeton University. Its mission is to disseminate scholarship within academia and society at large.

The press was founded by Whitney Darrow, with the financial support of Charles Scribner, as a printing press to serve the Princeton community in 1905.[2] Its distinctive building was constructed in 1911 on William Street in Princeton.[3] Its first book was a new 1912 edition of John Witherspoon's Lectures on Moral Philosophy.[4]

History

Princeton University Press was founded in 1905 by a recent Princeton graduate, Whitney Darrow, with financial support from another Princetonian, Charles Scribner II. Darrow and Scribner purchased the equipment and assumed the operations of two already existing local publishers, that of the Princeton Alumni Weekly and the Princeton Press. The new press printed both local newspapers, university documents, The Daily Princetonian, and later added book publishing to its activities.[5] Beginning as a small, for-profit printer, Princeton University Press was reincorporated as a nonprofit in 1910.[6] Since 1911, the press has been headquartered in a purpose-built gothic-style building designed by Ernest Flagg. The design of press’s building, which was named the Scribner Building in 1965, was inspired by the Plantin-Moretus Museum, a printing museum in Antwerp, Belgium. Princeton University Press established a European office, in Woodstock, England, north of Oxford, in 1999, and opened an additional office, in Beijing, in early 2017.

Pulitzers and other major awards

Six books from Princeton University Press have won Pulitzer Prizes:

Books from Princeton University Press have also been awarded the Bancroft Prize, the Nautilus Book Award, and the National Book Award.

Papers projects

Multi-volume historical documents projects undertaken by the Press include:

The Papers of Woodrow Wilson has been called "one of the great editorial achievements in all history."[13]

Bollingen Series

Princeton University Press's Bollingen Series had its beginnings in the Bollingen Foundation, a 1943 project of Paul Mellon's Old Dominion Foundation. From 1945, the foundation had independent status, publishing and providing fellowships and grants in several areas of study, including archaeology, poetry, and psychology. The Bollingen Series was given to the university in 1969.

Other series

Sciences

  • Annals of Mathematics Studies (Alice Chang, Phillip A. Griffiths, Assaf Naor, editors; Lillian Pierce, associate editor)
  • Princeton Series in Applied Mathematics (Ingrid Daubechies, Weinan E, Jan Karel Lenstra, Endre Süli, editors)
  • Princeton Series in Astrophysics (David N. Spergel, editor)
  • Princeton Series in Complexity (Simon A. Levin and Steven H. Strogatz, editors)
  • Princeton Series in Evolutionary Biology (H. Allen Orr, editor)
  • Princeton Series in International Economics (Gene M. Grossman, editor)
  • Princeton Science Library

Humanities

  • Princeton Modern Greek Studies[14]

Selected titles

  • The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party's Revolution and the Battle over American History, by Jill Lepore (2010)
  • The Meaning of Relativity by Albert Einstein (1922)
  • Atomic Energy for Military Purposes by Henry DeWolf Smyth (1945)
  • How to Solve It by George Polya (1945)
  • The Open Society and Its Enemies by Karl Popper (1945)
  • The Hero With a Thousand Faces by Joseph Campbell (1949)
  • The Wilhelm/Baynes translation of the I Ching, Bollingen Series XIX. First copyright 1950, 27th printing 1997.
  • Anatomy of Criticism by Northrop Frye (1957)
  • Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature by Richard Rorty (1979)
  • QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter by Richard Feynman (1985)
  • The Great Contraction 1929–1933 by Milton Friedman and Anna Jacobson Schwartz (1963) with a new Introduction by Peter L. Bernstein (2008)
  • Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle by Stephen Biddle (2004)

References

  1. ^ North America & International Ordering Information
  2. ^ "Princeton University Press, Erected Through the Generousity [sic] of Charles Scribners, a New and Unique Adjunct to the University" (PDF). The New York Times. May 19, 1912.
  3. ^ Letich, Alexander (1978). A Princeton Companion. Princeton University Press. Archived from the original on 2017-10-19. Retrieved 2015-07-16.
  4. ^ A History of Princeton University Press (2002)
  5. ^ Axtell, James (2006). The Making of Princeton University: From Woodrow Wilson to the Present. Princeton: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0691126860.
  6. ^ "The New Princeton University Press". Publishers Weekly. New York. 79 (22): 2233–2234. June 3, 1911. Retrieved 16 July 2017.
  7. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes: 1957 Winners
  8. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes: 1958 Winners
  9. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes: 1961 Winners
  10. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes: 1963 Winners
  11. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes: 1965 Winners
  12. ^ The Pulitzer Prizes: 1990 Winners
  13. ^ Cooper, John Milton (2011). Woodrow Wilson: A Biography. Random House. p. 736. ISBN 9780307277909. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  14. ^ Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies – Publications

Further reading

External links

Media files used on this page

Usa edcp location map.svg
Author/Creator: Uwe Dedering, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
Location map of the USA (without Hawaii and Alaska).

EquiDistantConicProjection:
Central parallel:

* N: 37.0° N

Central meridian:

* E: 96.0° W

Standard parallels:

* 1: 32.0° N
* 2: 42.0° N

Made with Natural Earth. Free vector and raster map data @ naturalearthdata.com.

Formulas for x and y:

x = 50.0 + 124.03149777329222 * ((1.9694462586094064-({{{2}}}* pi / 180))
      * sin(0.6010514667026994 * ({{{3}}} + 96) * pi / 180))
y = 50.0 + 1.6155950752393982 * 124.03149777329222 * 0.02613325650382181
      - 1.6155950752393982  * 124.03149777329222 *
     (1.3236744353715044  - (1.9694462586094064-({{{2}}}* pi / 180)) 
      * cos(0.6010514667026994 * ({{{3}}} + 96) * pi / 180))
Princeton University Nassau tigers.jpg

Bronze tiger sculptures by Alexander Phimister Proctor (1862-1950), dedicated 1909, in front of Nassau Hall doors; Princeton University; Princeton, New Jersey

US-NationalParkService-ShadedLogo.svg

This is an image of a place or building that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places in the United States of America. Its reference number is 66000465.

Princeton University Press.jpg
Author/Creator: Djkeddie, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
The home of the Princeton University Press.
Location map of Mercer County, New Jersey.svg
This is a map of Mercer County, New Jersey, USA which includes incorporated settlements, township borders, and major highways.
USA New Jersey location map.svg
Author/Creator: Alexrk, Licence: CC BY 3.0
This map was created with GeoTools.
Princeton University Press logo.svg

This is the logo for Princeton University Press.