Marion County, South Carolina

Marion County
U.S. county
Mt. Olive Baptist Church (Mullins, South Carolina)
Mt. Olive Baptist Church (Mullins, South Carolina)
Map of South Carolina highlighting Marion County
Location within the U.S. state of South Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting South Carolina
South Carolina's location within the U.S.
Coordinates:34°05′N 79°22′W / 34.08°N 79.36°W / 34.08; -79.36
Country United States
State South Carolina
Founded1800
SeatMarion
Largest cityMarion
Area
 • Total494 sq mi (1,280 km2)
 • Land489 sq mi (1,270 km2)
 • Water4.9 sq mi (13 km2)  1.0%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total33,062
 • Estimate 
(2020)
30,258
 • Density67/sq mi (26/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district7th
Websitewww.marionsc.org

Marion County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2010 census, its population was 33,062.[1] Its county seat is Marion.[2] The county was created in 1785 and was originally known as Liberty County. However, four years later it was renamed Marion County, in honor of Brigadier General Francis Marion,[3] the famous "Swamp Fox" and a hero of the American Revolutionary War. In 1910, a separated portion of the county was founded as adjacent Dillon County.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 494 square miles (1,280 km2), of which 489 square miles (1,270 km2) is land and 4.9 square miles (13 km2) (1.0%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties

National protected area

Major highways

  • Future I-73
  • US 76.svg US 76
  • US 301.svg US 301
  • US 378.svg US 378
  • US 501.svg US 501 (BUS)
  • South Carolina 9.svg SC 9
  • South Carolina 38.svg SC 38
  • South Carolina 41.svg SC 41 (ALT)
  • South Carolina 57.svg SC 57
  • South Carolina 576.svg SC 576
  • South Carolina 908.svg SC 908
  • South Carolina 917.svg SC 917

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
18006,914
18108,88428.5%
182010,20114.8%
183011,2089.9%
184013,93224.3%
185017,40724.9%
186021,19021.7%
187022,1604.6%
188034,10753.9%
189029,976−12.1%
190035,18117.4%
191020,596−41.5%
192023,72115.2%
193027,22114.8%
194030,10710.6%
195033,11010.0%
196032,014−3.3%
197030,270−5.4%
198034,17912.9%
199033,899−0.8%
200035,4664.6%
201033,062−6.8%
2020 (est.)30,258[5]−8.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[1]

2000 census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 35,466 people, 13,301 households, and 9,510 families living in the county. The population density was 72 people per square mile (28/km2). There were 15,143 housing units at an average density of 31 per square mile (12/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 56.35% Black or African American, 41.69% White, 0.25% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.90% from other races, and 0.52% from two or more races. 1.79% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,301 households, out of which 32.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.30% were married couples living together, 23.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.50% were non-families. 25.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 27.60% under the age of 18, 9.70% from 18 to 24, 26.80% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 85.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $26,526, and the median income for a family was $32,932. Males had a median income of $26,133 versus $18,392 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,878. About 18.90% of families and 23.20% of the population were below the poverty line, including 33.30% of those under age 18 and 23.50% of those age 65 or over.

According to the 2010 U.S. Religious Census, Marion County had the highest concentration of followers of the Baháʼí Faith of any county in the United States, at 5.5%.[11]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 33,062 people, 13,058 households, and 8,881 families living in the county.[12] The population density was 67.6 inhabitants per square mile (26.1/km2). There were 14,953 housing units at an average density of 30.6 per square mile (11.8/km2).[13] The racial makeup of the county was 55.9% black or African American, 40.6% white, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 1.3% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.4% of the population.[12] In terms of ancestry, 7.8% were American, 6.3% were English, and 5.2% were Irish.[14]

Of the 13,058 households, 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.0% were married couples living together, 24.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.0% were non-families, and 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.09. The median age was 39.9 years.[12]

The median income for a household in the county was $30,629 and the median income for a family was $38,043. Males had a median income of $32,414 versus $24,929 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,653. About 21.4% of families and 25.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.8% of those under age 18 and 19.1% of those age 65 or over.[15]

Communities

Cities

Towns

  • Nichols
  • Sellers

Census-designated places

  • Centenary
  • Daviston
  • Rains
  • Zion

Other unincorporated communities

  • Ariel Crossroad
  • Brittons Neck
  • Friendship
  • Gresham
  • Temperance Hill
  • Sellers

Politics

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[16]
YearRepublicanDemocraticThird parties
202038.8% 5,71160.3% 8,8720.8% 121
201638.1% 5,44460.0% 8,5691.8% 263
201234.5% 5,16464.7% 9,6880.9% 134
200835.7% 5,41663.3% 9,6081.0% 150
200441.4% 5,58957.5% 7,7671.1% 151
200038.6% 4,68760.6% 7,3580.9% 104
199634.4% 3,59560.9% 6,3594.8% 497
199235.2% 3,64756.3% 5,8438.5% 886
198846.4% 4,40352.8% 5,0080.8% 75
198448.1% 4,69851.6% 5,0430.3% 32
198037.7% 3,32161.1% 5,3791.2% 101
197634.1% 3,07665.7% 5,9270.1% 13
197264.7% 4,71934.9% 2,5450.5% 34
196836.9% 2,51241.4% 2,82121.8% 1,484
196461.0% 3,19739.0% 2,046
196040.7% 1,64659.3% 2,397
195613.2% 41744.0% 1,39042.8% 1,353
195259.0% 2,31341.0% 1,610
19480.9% 1419.6% 30179.5% 1,219
19441.0% 992.9% 8586.2% 57
19402.5% 1897.6% 716
19360.4% 599.6% 1,219
19321.3% 1298.8% 948
19287.0% 5193.0% 682
19240.3% 299.7% 616
19200.1% 199.9% 808
19160.3% 399.1% 1,0190.6% 6
19120.4% 398.1% 7101.5% 11
19043.2% 4996.9% 1,507
19008.4% 11991.6% 1,296

Historic places

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 2, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 200.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 30, 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 18, 2015.
  10. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14.
  11. ^ Religious Congregations and Membership Study. "2010 Religious Census Data" (PDF). Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. Retrieved 7 May 2012.
  12. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-03-11.
  13. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-03-11.
  14. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-03-11.
  15. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2020-02-13. Retrieved 2016-03-11.
  16. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-13.

External links

Coordinates:34°05′N 79°22′W / 34.08°N 79.36°W / 34.08; -79.36

Media files used on this page

Flag of the United States.svg
Author/Creator: unknown, Licence: PD
US 301.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 908.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 501.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 301 Church St., Mullins, South Carolina.JPG
Author/Creator: ProfReader, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Mt. Olive Baptist Church, 301 Church St., Mullins, South Carolina
South Carolina 41.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina 38.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 76.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 9.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina 576.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina in United States.svg
Author/Creator: TUBSEmail Silk.svg Gallery, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
Location of state of South Carolina in United States in the United States
Map of South Carolina highlighting Marion County.svg
This is a locator map showing Marion County in South Carolina. For more information, see Commons:United States county locator maps.
South Carolina 57.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 378.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 917.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway