Interstate 20 in South Carolina

Interstate 20 marker
Interstate 20
J. Strom Thurmond Freeway
I-20 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by SCDOT
Length141.51 mi[1][2] (227.74 km)
Existed1964–present
Major junctions
West end I-20 at Georgia state line
  I-520 in North Augusta
I-26 / US 76 in Columbia
I-77 in Columbia
East end I-95 / I-20 BS in Florence
Location
CountiesAiken, Lexington, Richland, Kershaw, Lee, Darlington, Florence
Highway system
  • Main
  • Auxiliary
  • Suffixed
  • Business
  • Future
SC 19 SC 20

Interstate 20 (I-20) is the main east-west interstate in the state of South Carolina, linking the state with important transportation and business hubs to the north, west and south, including Atlanta, Georgia; Charlotte, North Carolina (via I-77); Savannah, Georgia (via I-95); and Washington, D.C. (via I-95).

Route description

I-20 enters the Palmetto State after crossing the Savannah River from Augusta, Georgia. Known as the J. Strom Thurmond Freeway, the highway heads northeastward, bypassing Aiken and Lexington before reaching the state capital of Columbia. It was constructed in various stages beginning in late 1963, with the final section between SC-340 and the Business Spur opening in August 1975.

At Columbia, I-20 crosses the Saluda and Broad rivers and travels through the northern part of the city and turns eastward, bypassing Fort Jackson and Camden before reaching Florence. It is at Florence where I-20 sees its eastern terminus at I-95. However, for about 2 miles (3.2 km), the highway continues to downtown Florence as Business Spur 20.

Services

The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) operates and maintains one welcome center and two rest areas along I-20. The welcome center, which has a travel information facility on site, is located in North Augusta at mile markers 0.5 (eastbound), and the rest areas are located in Lugoff at mile markers 99 (east and westbound) between Exit 92 (US 601) and the bridges over the Wateree River. Common at all locations are public restrooms, public telephones, vending machines, picnic area and barbecue grills. A pair of closed rest areas exist between Exits 44 and 51.

The South Carolina Department of Public Safety (SCDPS) and State Transport Police (STP) operate and maintain two truck inspection/weigh stations. The eastbound truck weigh station can be found in Jones Crossroads at mile marker 35, and the westbound weigh station can be found in Lexington at mile marker 53.5.

History

Approaching the eastern end of I-20 on I-95

I-20 first appeared between 1964-1967, with its first section completed from SC 6, south of Lexington, to Spears Creek Church Road (S-40-53), south of Pontiac.[3][4] A second section, from the Georgia state line to US 25 / SC 121 was completed in 1967. [5] In 1968 or 1969, I-20 was extended east from Spears Creek Church Road (S-40-53) to US 601, south of Camden.[6] In 1971, I-20 combined the two segments by completing the gap between US 25 / SC 121 to SC 6.[7] In 1973, I-20 was extended east to US 521. In 1974, it extended east again to US 15. In 1975, another extension east to US 401. And finally, in 1976, I-20 reached its destination with I-95 and the city of Florence.[8] Also same year exit numbers were installed.

In the late 1980s, I-20 was widened to six lanes between US 378 and I-77.

Proposed extensions

The first proposal to extend I-20 was at the time of its designation in the state, and consisted of plans to extend it east from Florence to Myrtle Beach. However, because Myrtle Beach was not yet the tourist destination it later became, the state eventually widened US 76, US 501 and established SC 576 connecting the two U.S. Highways in the 1970s.[9]

In 2003, North Carolina Governor Mike Easley pushed forward a proposal to extend I-20 eastward from Florence to Wilmington, which became part of NCDOT's strategic transportation plan. The proposed routing would overlap I-20 along I-95 to the I-74 / US 74 interchange, then travel east (concurrently with US 74) into Wilmington. In 2005, this proposal became part of the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation, North Carolina received $5 million for a feasibility study for this extension.

While the extension had support in North Carolina, with justification that a direct route from Atlanta to the Port of Wilmington could be a boom to the economy, this view was not shared by officials in South Carolina. In 2009, soon after Governor Mike Easley left office, the proposed routing was removed from all NCDOT plans and was officially dropped. The proposal was never officially discussed with SCDOT nor submitted to AASHTO and FHWA for consideration.[10]

Future

I-26/I-126 interchange

The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT), in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), is proposing improvements to the interstate corridor of I-20/26/126, including the system interchanges at I-20/I-26 and I-26/I-126 in Lexington and Richland Counties. These improvements are proposed to increase mobility and enhance traffic operations by reducing existing traffic congestion within the I-20/26/126 corridor, while accommodating future traffic needs. The corridor's approximately 14 miles (23 km) of mainline interstate include I-26 from Exit 101 - Broad River Road (US 176) to east of the Saluda River, I-20 from the west of the Saluda River to west of the Broad River, and I-126 from I-26 to east of the interchange with Colonial Life Boulevard.[11]

Widening projects

This project represents the first bi-state agreement between GDOT and SCDOT for a design-build project. This design-build project is for the widening of I-20 with an additional lane in each direction. The widening begins just west of Georgia SR 104 interchange (I-20 GA exit 200) and it will terminate at SC 230 interchange (I-20 SC exit 1). The project will widen 1.8 miles (2.9 km) of I-20, replace four bridges over the Augusta Canal and Savannah River, and make intersection improvements at the West Martintown Road interchange in South Carolina. This project will cost $72 million and is scheduled to be completed in 2022.[12]

Another design-build project is for the widening of I-20 with an additional lane in each direction. The widening will begin just east of US 378 where the roadway transitions from a six lane section to a four lane section and terminate west of the Longs Pond Road interchange near mile marker 49. The I-20 eastbound and westbound bridges over Norfolk Southern Railroad will be replaced. The pavement for the project will consist of both concrete and asphalt and the existing concrete pavement section will require reconstruction.[13]

Exit list

CountyLocationmi[2]kmExitDestinationsNotes
AikenNorth Augusta0.00.0 I-20 west (SR 402) – AtlantaContinuation into Georgia
1.21.91 SC 230 – North Augusta
4.97.95 US 25 / SC 121 – Edgefield, Johnston
5.69.06 I-520 west (Palmetto Parkway) – North Augusta, AugustaEastern terminus of I-520 and Palmetto Parkway; i-520, exit 23
11.117.911Bettis Academy Road – Graniteville
Aiken17.728.518 SC 19 – Aiken, Johnston, Edgefield
21.935.222 US 1 – Aiken, Ridge Spring
29.347.229Wire Road
32.452.133 SC 39 – Wagener, Monetta, Ridge Spring
Lexington38.762.339 US 178 – Pelion, Batesburg-Leesville
44.171.044Road 34 – Gilbert
50.881.851Longs Pond Road
Lexington54.888.255 SC 6 – Swansea, Pelion, LexingtonSigned as exits 55A (east) and 55B (west) westbound
57.592.558 US 1 – Lexington, West ColumbiaTo Columbia Airport
61.198.361 US 378 – West Columbia, Lexington
RichlandColumbia63.2101.763Bush River Road
64.0103.064 I-26 / US 76 – Spartanburg, CharlestonSigned as exits 64A (east) and 64B (west); I-26 exit 107
65.0104.665 US 176 (Broad River Road)
68.2109.868 SC 215 (Monticello Road) – Jenkinsville
69.6112.070 US 321 (Fairfield Road) – Winnsboro
71.0114.371 US 21 (North Main Street)
72.1116.072 SC 555 (Farrow Road)
72.7117.073
SC 277 to I-77 north – Columbia, Charlotte
Signed as exits 73A (south) and 73B (north); I-20 westbound has no access to SC 277 northbound; SC 277 southbound has no access to I-20 eastbound
73.9118.974 US 1 (Two Notch Road)
75.5121.576 I-77 / Alpine Road – Charleston, CharlotteWestbound signed as exit 76A (I-77) and exit 76B (Alpine Road); I-77 exit 16; eastbound exit Alpine Road to I-77 north
79.8128.480Clemson Road
81.5131.282Spears Creek Church Road – Pontiac
Kershaw86.7139.587White Pond Road – Elgin
Lugoff91.5147.392 US 601 – Lugoff, Camden, St. Matthews
Camden97.5156.998 US 521 – Camden, Sumter, RembertTo Camden Military Academy
101.2162.9101Road 329
Lee107.5173.0108Jamestown Road – Manville
Bishopville115.8186.4116 US 15 – Sumter, Bishopville
119.7192.6120 SC 341 – Bishopville, Lynchburg, Elliott
122.4197.0123Road 22 – LamarTo Lee State Park
Darlington130.6210.2131
US 401 to SC 403 – Timmonsville, Darlington, Hartsville, Sumter
137.0220.5137 SC 340 – Darlington, Timmonsville
FlorenceFlorence141.2–
141.5
227.2–
227.7
141 I-95 – Fayetteville, SavannahEastern terminus of I-20; signed as exits 141A (north) and 141B (south); I-95 exit 160B
I-20 BS east – FlorenceContinuation beyond I-95
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Related routes

I-20 has one auxiliary Interstate within South Carolina. Numbered I-520, it runs between North Augusta and Augusta, Georgia. Originally a spur, it serves as a partial beltway of the Augusta area, split between Georgia and South Carolina.

Interstate 20 Business

Interstate 20 Business marker

Interstate 20 Business

LocationFlorence, South Carolina
Length2.110 mi[14] (3.396 km)
Existed1970–present

Interstate 20 Business (I-20 Bus) is a 2.110-mile (3.396 km) four-lane boulevard-grade business spur of I-20 along David H. McLeod Boulevard, between I-95 and West Evans Street.[15] At its eastern end, the roadway continues as US 76 Connector.[16] Construction began by 1969, completed in 1970, it has remained unchanged since inception.[17]

The entire route is in Florence, Florence County.

mi[14]kmExitDestinationsNotes
0.0000.000 I-20 west – ColumbiaContinuation beyond I-95
141 I-95 – Fayetteville, SavannahInterchange; western terminus of I-20 Bus.; signed as exits 141A (north) and 141B (south); exit numbering follows I-20; I-95 exit 160A.
2.1103.396

West Evans Street / US 76 Conn. east to US 76 / SC 51 south – Timmonsville, Downtown Florence, Arts Corridor, Tennis Center, Beach traffic
Eastern terminus of I-20 Bus.; western terminus of US 76 Conn.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
  •       Route transition

See also

References

  1. ^ "Table 1". Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved September 26, 2007.
  2. ^ a b Google (June 5, 2014). "Interstate 20 in South Carolina" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  3. ^ General Highway Map, Richland County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1963. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  4. ^ General Highway Map, Richland County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1967. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  5. ^ General Highway Map, Aiken County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1967. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  6. ^ General Highway Map, Richland County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1970. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  7. ^ General Highway Map, Aiken County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1973. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  8. ^ General Highway Map, Florence County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1976. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  9. ^ Grainger, Kyle (February 19, 2009). "Why Interstate 73 and not I-20 to Myrtle Beach?". WMBF-TV. Myrtle Beach, SC. Retrieved June 5, 2014.
  10. ^ "My Reporter Column Question on I-20 Going to Wilmington". StarNewsOnline.com. Retrieved October 4, 2014.
  11. ^ "Construction Phasing".
  12. ^ "I-20 @ Savannah River Bridge Replacements".
  13. ^ "I-20 WIDENING (MILE MARKERS 49-60)".
  14. ^ a b "Highway Logmile Report". South Carolina Department of Transportation. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
  15. ^ Google (December 14, 2020). "Overview map of I-20 Bus. (Florence, South Carolina)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
  16. ^ Florence Urban Area (PDF) (Map). South Carolina Department of Transportation. July 2020. p. Sheet 4. §§ D5-D6. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
  17. ^ General Highway Map, Florence County, South Carolina (PDF) (Map). Cartography by SCDOT. South Carolina Department of Transportation. 1970. Retrieved June 5, 2014.

External links

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata


Media files used on this page

South Carolina 20.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 25.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
US 1.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
To plate South Carolina.svg
600 mm by 300 mm (24 in by 12 in) To plate, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs (sign M4-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) Colors are from [1] (Pantone Blue 294), converted to RGB by [2]. The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border.
To plate.svg
600 mm by 300 mm (24 in by 12 in) to plate, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs (sign M4-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border.
Flag of the United States.svg
Author/Creator: unknown, Licence: PD
South Carolina 555.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
To plate blue.svg
600 mm by 300 mm (24 in by 12 in) to plate, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs (sign M4-5). Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.) Colors are from [1] (Pantone Blue 294), converted to RGB by [2]. The outside border has a width of 1 (1 mm) and a color of black so it shows up; in reality, signs have no outside border.
South Carolina 277.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina 39.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina 341.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 321.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
US 15.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
US 176.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
US 601.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 121.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 76.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 6.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 521.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 230.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 21.svg
600 mm × 600 mm (24 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 215.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina 19.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 401.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 340.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 178.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)
South Carolina 51.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
South Carolina 403.svg
A new version of the shield for a South Carolina State Highway
US 378.svg
750 mm × 600 mm (30 in × 24 in) U.S. Highway shield, made to the specifications of the 2004 edition of Standard Highway Signs. (Note that there is a missing "J" label on the left side of the diagram.) Uses the Roadgeek 2005 fonts. (United States law does not permit the copyrighting of typeface designs, and the fonts are meant to be copies of a U.S. Government-produced work anyway.)