Gazar

Gazar (also gazaar) is a silk or wool plain weave fabric made with high-twist double yarns woven as one. Gazar has a crisp hand and a smooth texture.[1]

Silk gazar is much used in bridal and evening fashion due to its ability to hold its shape. Gazar was developed by the Swiss textile firm Abraham in collaboration with Basque couturier Cristóbal Balenciaga, who featured silk gazar in his collections of 1960–68.[2] Balenciaga's mastery of this gleaming, lightweight fabric with its "claylike" ability to hold its shape was exemplified by the trapezoid wedding gowns in his collections of 1967 and 1968.[2]

Notes

  1. ^ Tortora and Merkel (1996), p. 241
  2. ^ a b Schoeser (2007), p. 146

References

  • Schoeser, Mary (2007). Silk. Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-11741-7.
  • Tortora, Phyllis; Merkel, Robert S. (1996). Fairchild's Dictionary of Textiles (7 ed.). Fairchild. ISBN 0-87005-707-3.

Media files used on this page

Jute nahtlos.png
Author/Creator: SoylentGreen, Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
Hessian Fabric made seamless. It will serve to create a normal map in Blender.
Batik Indonesia.jpg
Author/Creator: MartijnL, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0 nl
Batik cloth purchased in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
MacLachlan hunting tartan (D. W. Stewart).svg
Author/Creator: , Licence: CC BY-SA 2.5
A representation of the Maclachlan hunting tartan. This tartan is the oldest tartan to bear the name MacLachlan. This tartan is referred to as the Old MacLachlan, MacLachlan, and Hunting MacLachlan. This sett was first published in Old & Rare Scottish Tartans by D. W. Stewart in 1893.
Thread count: Y6, W4, Bk32, G32, Y6, W4, R48.
Sources: MacLachlan Clan Tartan WR1710 MacLachlan Hunting Tartan