Demographics of South Carolina

Columbus Street, Charleston, South Carolina

The U.S. state of South Carolina is the 23rd largest state by population, with a population of 5,024,369 according to 2017 United States Census estimates.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1790249,073
1800345,59138.8%
1810415,11520.1%
1820502,74121.1%
1830581,18515.6%
1840594,3982.3%
1850668,50712.5%
1860703,7085.3%
1870705,6060.3%
1880995,57741.1%
18901,151,14915.6%
19001,340,31616.4%
19101,515,40013.1%
19201,683,72411.1%
19301,738,7653.3%
19401,899,8049.3%
19502,117,02711.4%
19602,382,59412.5%
19702,590,5168.7%
19803,121,82020.5%
19903,486,70311.7%
20004,012,01215.1%
20104,625,38415.3%
20205,118,42510.7%
Source: 1910–2020[1]

South Carolina's center of population is 2.4 mi (3.9 km) north of the State House in the city of Columbia.[2]

According to the United States Census Bureau, as of 2017, South Carolina had an estimated population of 5,024,369, which is an increase of 64,547 from the prior year and an increase of 399,005, or 8.6%, since the year 2010. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 36,401 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 115,084 people.

According to the University of South Carolina's Arnold School of Public Health, Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies, South Carolina's foreign-born population grew faster than any other state between 2000 and 2005.[3] The Consortium reports that the number of Hispanics in South Carolina is greatly undercounted by census enumerators and may be more than 400,000.[3][4]

Demographics of South Carolina (csv)
By raceWhiteBlackAIAN*AsianNHPI*
2000 (total population)68.88%30.01%0.69%1.13%0.10%
2000 (Hispanic only)2.05%0.26%0.05%0.03%0.02%
2005 (total population)69.12%29.68%0.69%1.31%0.10%
2005 (Hispanic only)2.95%0.27%0.06%0.04%0.02%
Growth 2000–05 (total population)6.43%4.89%6.09%23.49%13.76%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only)5.01%4.87%4.61%23.16%10.36%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only)52.78%7.64%23.97%34.25%26.89%
* AIAN is American Indian or Alaskan Native; NHPI is Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander

South Carolina’s population increased by 15.4 percent between 1990 and 2000 and by another 7.4 percent between 2000 and 2005; 11.6 percent of that increase has been attributed to immigration, primarily from Mexico and Latin America. Most work in the construction industry, with another proportion in agriculture, in addition to processing factories. Latino population has increased considerably faster in South Carolina and the Southeast than for the United States as a whole.[5]

The five largest ancestry groups in South Carolina identified by respondents to the US census are African American (29.5%), American (13.9%), English (8.4%), German (8.4%) and Irish (7.9%) (thus a total of more than 39% from northern Europe).

From 1720 until 1920, African slaves and their descendants made up a majority of the state's population. (See census data below.) Whites became a majority in the state after that date, following the migration of tens of thousands of blacks to northern industrial cities in the Great Migration. In the 21st century, most of the African-American population in the state lives in the Lowcountry and the Midlands areas, historically areas of their greatest concentrations of population.

6.6% of South Carolina's total population were reported as under 5 years old, 25.2% under 18, and 12.1% were 65 or older. Females made up approximately 51.4% of the population in 2000. Those who self-identify as having American ancestry are of mostly British Isles ancestry: English and Scots-Irish stock.

Birth data

Note: Births in table do not add up, because Hispanics are counted both by their ethnicity and by their race, giving a higher overall number.

Live Births by Single Race/Ethnicity of Mother
Race2013[6]2014[7]2015[8]2016[9]2017[10]2018[11]2019[12]
> White33,085 (58.2%)33,639 (58.4%)33,927 (58.4%)32,929 (57.4%)32,283 (56.6%)31,890 (56.3%)31,660 (55.5%)
Black18,591 (32.7%)18,598 (32.3%)18,577 (32.0%)16,527 (28.8%)16,851 (29.5%)16,681 (29.4%)16,802 (29.5%)
Asian1,235 (2.2%)1,293 (2.2%)1,289 (2.2%)1,134 (2.0%)1,125 (2.0%)1,172 (2.1%)1,155 (2.0%)
American Indian201 (0.3%)193 (0.3%)217 (0.4%)151 (0.3%)183 (0.3%)156 (0.3%)176 (0.3%)
Hispanic (of Native American race)4,411 (7.8%)4,646 (8.1%)4,942 (8.5%)5,135 (8.9%)5,221 (9.2%)5,255 (9.3%)5,741 (10.1%)
Total South Carolina56,795 (100%)57,627 (100%)58,139 (100%)57,342 (100%)57,029 (100%)56,669 (100%)57,038 (100%)
  • Since 2016, data for births of White Hispanic origin are not collected, but included in one Hispanic group; persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

Center of population

South Carolina Population Density in 2010.

Most populous counties

CountySeat2000 Population2010 Population2017 Population
GreenvilleGreenville379,616451,225506,837
RichlandColumbia320,667384,504411,592
CharlestonCharleston309,969350,209401,438
HorryConway196,629269,291333,268
SpartanburgSpartanburg253,431284,307306,854
LexingtonLexington216,014254,920290,642
YorkYork164,614229,073266,439
BerkeleyMoncks Corner142,651177,843217,937
AndersonAnderson165,740187,126198,759
BeaufortBeaufort120,937162,233186,844

Cities and towns

Largest municipalities

Population estimates as of 2010.

City and MSAs

South Carolina's metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) are much larger than their central city population counts suggest. South Carolina law makes it difficult for municipalities to annex unincorporated areas, so city proper populations look smaller than is reflected in the total metropolitan populations.

For example, Myrtle Beach has a municipal population of less than 50,000 persons, but its MSA has more than 200,000 persons. Anderson's municipal population is smaller than Sumter's, but the Anderson MSA is larger, as seen below.

Columbia, Charleston, and Greenville all have urbanized area populations between 400,000–550,000, while their metropolitan statistical area (MSA) populations are each more than 600,000. The Greenville-Spartanburg-Anderson MSA population consists of approximately 1.4 million people, making it the largest in the state and third largest in the Carolinas.

Urban Area Population

As of 2010:[13]

Religion

St. Matthew's German Evangelical Lutheran Church in Charleston is the tallest house of worship in the state. Its spire rises 255 feet.

South Carolina residents are majority Protestant Christian, with a lower percentage of people claiming no religious affiliation than the national average. The religious affiliations of the people of South Carolina are as follows:

Sephardic Jews have lived in the state for more than 300 years,[15][16][17] especially in and around Charleston. Many came from London, where they were merchants.[18] Until about 1830, South Carolina had the largest population of Jews in North America, most in Charleston. Some have married and assimilated into Christian society; in the 21st century, less than 1% of the total religiously affiliated people are Jewish. The proportion of Roman Catholics in the state has been increasing given migrants from the North and immigration from Latin America.

Historical demographics

Beginning in 1790, the United States Census Bureau collected the population statistics of South Carolina. The years listed prior to that are estimates and exclude the Native American population. From 1790 until 1860, the designated demographic classifications were  white,  black slave and  free black.

Following the Civil War, the racial groupings were  white,  black and  other.

The following is a list of census data for the state of South Carolina:[19]

Census
Year
DemographicPopulation% of Pop.% Growth
1670White14090.3%
Slave159.7%
Total155100%-
1680White1,00083.3%+614.3%
Slave20016.7%+1233.3%
Total1,200100%+674.2%
1700White3,10056.4%+210.0%
Slave2,40043.6%+1100.0%
Total5,500100%+358.3%
1708White4,08042.6%+31.6%
Black Slaves4,10042.8%
Indian Slaves1,40014.6%
Total9,580100%+74.2%

1720White6,50035.1%+59.3%
Slave12,00064.9%+118.2%
Total18,500100%+93.1%
1730White10,00033.3%+53.9%
Slave20,00066.7%+66.7%
Total30,000100%+62.2%
1740White20,00033.3%+100.0%
Slave40,00066.7%+100.0%
Total60,000100%+100.0%
1750White21,66733.3%+8.3%
Slave43,33366.7%+8.3%
Total65,000100%+8.3%
1760White32,00038.1%+47.7%
Slave52,00061.9%+20.0%
Total84,000100%+29.2%
1770White50,00038.5%+56.3%
Slave80,00061.5%+53.9%
Total130,000100%+54.7%
1780White83,00046.1%+66.0%
Slave97,00053.9%+21.3%
Total180,000100%+38.5%
1790White140,17856.3%+68.9%
Slave107,09443.0%+10.4%
Free Black1,8010.7%
Total249,073100%+38.4%
1800White196,25556.8%+40.0%
Slave146,15142.3%+36.5%
Free Black3,1850.9%+76.9%
Total345,591100%+38.8%
1810White214,19651.6%+9.1%
Slave196,36547.3%+34.4%
Free Black4,5541.1%+42.9%
Total415,115100%+20.1%
1820White237,44047.2%+10.9%
Slave258,47551.4%+31.6%
Free Black6,8261.4%+49.9%
Total502,741100%+21.1%
1830White257,86344.4%+8.6%
Slave323,32255.6%+25.1%
Total581,185100%+15.6%
1840White259,08443.6%+0.5%
Slave327,03855.0%+1.2%
Free Black8,2761.4%+21.2%
Total594,398100%+2.3%
1850White274,56341.1%+6.0%
Slave393,94458.9%+20.5%
Total668,507100%+12.5%
1860White271,30041.4%+6.1%
Slave487,40657.2%+2.2%
Free Black9,9141.4%+19.8%
Other880.0%
Total703,708100%+5.3%
1870White289,66741.1%-0.6%
Black465,81458.9%+3.3%
Other1250.0%+42.1%
Total705,606100%+0.3%
1880White391,10539.3%+35.0%
Black604,33260.7%+45.3%
Other1400.0%+12.0%
Total995,577100%+41.1%
1890White462,00840.1%+18.1%
Black728,93459.9%+14.0%
Other2070.0%+47.9%
Total1,151,149100%+15.6%
1900White547,80741.6%+20.7%
Black789,32158.4%+13.6%
Other1880.0%-9.2%
Total1,340,316100%+16.4%
1910White679,16144.9%+21.8%
Black833,84355.1%+6.6%
Other3960.0%+110.6%
Total1,515,400100%+13.1%
1920White878,53851.4%+20.5%
Black864,71948.6%+3.7%
Other4670.0%+17.9%
Total1,683,724100%+11.1%
1930White994,04954.3%+15.3%
Black693,68145.6%-8.2%
Other1,0350.1%+121.6%
Total1,738,765100%+3.3%
1940White1,084,30857.1%+14.9%
Black714,16442.9%+2.6%
Other1,3320.1%+28.7%
Total1,899,804100%+9.3%
1950White1,293,40561.1%+19.3%
Black722,07738.8%+1.0%
Other1,5450.1%+16.0%
Total2,117,027100%+11.4%
1960White1,551,02265.1%+19.9%
Black829,29134.8%+0.9%
Other2,2810.1%+47.6%
Total2,382,594100%+12.5%
1970White1,794,43069.3%+15.7%
Black789,04130.4%-4.9%
Other7,0450.3%+208.9%
Total2,590,516100%+8.7%
1980White2,147,22468.8%+19.7%
Black948,62330.4%+20.2%
Other25,9730.8%+268.7%
Total3,121,820100%+20.5%
1990White2,406,97469.0%+12.1%
Black1,039,88429.8%+9.6%
Other39,8451.2%+53.4%
Total3,486,703100%+11.7%
2000White2,695,56067.2%+12.0%
Black1,185,21629.5%+14.0%
Other131,2363.3%+229.4%
Total4,012,012100%+15.1%
2010White3,062,00066.2%+13.6%
Black1,290,68427.9%+8.9%
Other274,6805.9%+109.3%
Total4,625,364100%+15.3%

References

  1. ^ "Historical Population Change Data (1910–2020)". Census.gov. United States Census Bureau. Archived April 29, 2021, at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Population and Population Centers by State: 2000". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 8, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2008.
  3. ^ a b "The Economic and Social Implications of the Growing Latino Population in South Carolina," A Study for the South Carolina Commission for Minority Affairs prepared by The Consortium for Latino Immigration Studies, University of South Carolina, August 2007. Retrieved June 4, 2008.
  4. ^ ""Mexican Immigrants: The New Face of the South Carolina Labor Force," Archived October 1, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Moore School of Business, Division of Research, IMBA Globilization Project, University of South Carolina, March 2006.
  5. ^ Darien Blair Sutton and Doug Woodward, Ph.D., Latino Immigration: Implications for Business, Division of Research, June 2009, pp. 3-5, Darla Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina, accessed 1 May 2015
  6. ^ "Births: Final Data for 2013" (PDF). Cdc.gov. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  7. ^ "Births: Final Data for 2014" (PDF). Cdc.gov. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  8. ^ "Births: Final Data for 2015" (PDF). Cdc.gov. Retrieved January 2, 2018.
  9. ^ Martin, Joyce A.; Hamilton, Brady E.; Osterman, Michelle J.K.; Driscoll, Anne K.; Drake, Patrick (January 31, 2018). Births: Final Data for 2016 (PDF). National Vital Statistics Reports (Report). 67. National Center for Health Statistics.
  10. ^ https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf
  11. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  12. ^ "Data" (PDF). www.cdc.gov. Retrieved April 9, 2021.
  13. ^ "America's Urban Population: Patterns & Characteristics". Proximity. Retrieved February 5, 2012.
  14. ^ Pew Research Wrote (2014). "A "Religion in South Carolina" | Pew Research 2014". pew research.org.com. Retrieved September 12, 2017.
  15. ^ Keri Howell wrote (April 5, 2010). "A "portion of the People" | Harvard Magazine Jan–Feb 2003". Harvardmagazine.com. Archived from the original on December 1, 2008. Retrieved July 31, 2010.
  16. ^ David Banks (March 25, 2002). "300 Years of Jewish History in South Carolina". NPR. Archived from the original on October 29, 2013. Retrieved July 31, 2010.
  17. ^ "A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life Entrance to Website". Lib.unc.edu. August 18, 2006. Archived from the original on April 19, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2010.
  18. ^ "A Portion of the People: Three Hundred Years of Southern Jewish Life". Sc.edu. Retrieved July 3, 2011.
  19. ^ Rogers Jr., George C. and C. James Taylor (1994). A South Carolina Chronology 1497–1992. University of South Carolina Press. ISBN 0-87249-971-5.

External links

Media files used on this page

Historic West Main buildings.jpg
Author/Creator: PegasusRacer28, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Several historic buildings (built ca. 1890-1910) along West Main Street on the lower end of Morgan Square in downtown Spartanburg
City of North Charleston city hall.JPG
The new City Of North Charleston City Hall.
  • It opened in 2009.
St. Matthews Lutheran (Charleston, SC).jpg
Author/Creator: Cadetgray, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
St. Matthew's German Evangelical Lutheran Church in Charleston, SC
Charlestonhome.jpg
Author/Creator: The original uploader was Diligent Terrier at English Wikipedia., Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0
 :* Copyright held by Evan Schmidt
Updated by --EvanS 17:20, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
SkylinefromArsenalHill.jpg
Author/Creator: Akhenaton06, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
skyline of downtown Columbia, South Carolina, USA from Arsenal Hill
South Carolina population map.png
Author/Creator: JimIrwin at English Wikipedia, Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
South Carolina population density map based on Census 2010. See the data lineage for a process description.
Fallsatgreenvillesc.jpg
Author/Creator: CantoV CantoV Yousef Abdul-Husain, Licence: CC BY 3.0
The Falls in downtown Greenville, South Carolina
Myrtle Beach day 2008.jpg
Author/Creator: Phil Guest from Bournemouth, UK, Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0
Myrtle Beach in South Carolina
Harbour Town July 2007.jpg
(c) MoodyGroove at the English Wikipedia, CC-BY-SA-3.0
Harbor of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, United States.
Columbus Street near Meeting Street 2 Charleston South Carolina.jpg
Author/Creator: Mydogtryed, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0
Columbus Street near Meeting Street 2_Charleston South Carolina