Clothtech

Clothtech (clothing textiles) is a segment of technical textiles that includes all textile components used primarily in clothing and footwear. Clothtech adds functional properties to the product that improve specific and critical objectives.[1][2] Clothtech encompasses the functional parts that may not be visible, such as zippers, labels, sewing threads, elastics, insulating fiber fills, waddings, shoelaces, and drawcords velcro, and interlining cloths, etc. Sewing threads is the major component that accounts around 60% of the technical textiles under clothtech followed by labels 19%, interlinings 8%, shoelaces and zip fasteners 5%, Velcro and umbrella 2%.[3][4][5][6][7][8]

Clothtech is a significant division of the technical textile sector, contributing 7% to the overall technical textile industry.[9]

Applications

Functional clothing

Clothtech adds functional properties in the end product that enhance adaptability, elasticity, insulation, resistance, and increase in wearing comfort hence the overall performance against predetermined areas.Clothtech adds resistance to water or fire and increases performances with breathability etc. Textiles with cloth tech respond to different stimuli such as the environment, the garments made with cloth tech can detect and transmit the vitals of the user (wearer).[2][6][3][4][5]

Footwear

Clothtech is used for various shoe components such as fabric, shoelaces, sole materials, and fillings, etc.

Use

The initial use of clothtech is apparel and footwear. High-performance garments, umbrella cloth Scuba diving, Body armors, firefighting suits are a few examples. Clothtech is one of the primary application areas of twelve direct application areas referred to in technical textiles.[6][10]

Manufacturing

Clothtech involves careful selection of fibers and a range of treatments (applications in machines such as exhaust, pad, or coatings) in various textile manufacturing stages. Different types of fibers ranging from natural to synthetic are used in clothtech. Woven, nonwoven, braided, and knitted all kinds of fabric manufacturing is selected.[11][12][13]

See also

References

  1. ^ Annapoorani, Grace S. (2018). Agro Textiles and Its Applications. Woodhead Publishing. p. 3. ISBN 978-93-85059-89-6.
  2. ^ a b Indian Textile Annual & Directory. Eastland Publications. 2001. pp. 111, 112.
  3. ^ a b Annapoorani, Grace S. (2018). Agro Textiles and Its Applications. Woodhead Publishing. p. 5. ISBN 978-93-85059-89-6.
  4. ^ a b Ahmad, Sheraz; Rasheed, Abher; Nawab, Yasir (2020). Fibers for Technical Textiles. Springer Nature. pp. 53, 210. ISBN 978-3-030-49224-3.
  5. ^ a b Patnaik, Asis; Patnaik, Sweta (2019-08-08). Fibres to Smart Textiles: Advances in Manufacturing, Technologies, and Applications. CRC Press. p. 318. ISBN 978-0-429-82193-6.
  6. ^ a b c Nawab, Yasir (2016-07-11). Textile Engineering: An introduction. Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG. pp. 6–25. ISBN 978-3-11-042389-1.
  7. ^ Textile Trends. Eastland Publications. 2003. p. 45.
  8. ^ "TECHNICAL TEXTILES | Home". www.technotex.gov.in. Retrieved 2021-01-07.
  9. ^ Textiles, Expert Committee on Technical (2004). Report of the Expert Committee on Technical Textiles. Government of India, Ministry of Textiles. p. 76.
  10. ^ JTN Monthly. Osaka Senken Limited. 2000. pp. 84, 32.
  11. ^ Ahmad, Sheraz; Rasheed, Abher; Nawab, Yasir (2020). Fibers for Technical Textiles. Springer Nature. p. 54. ISBN 978-3-030-49224-3.
  12. ^ Patnaik, Asis; Patnaik, Sweta (2019-08-08). Fibres to Smart Textiles: Advances in Manufacturing, Technologies, and Applications. CRC Press. p. 319. ISBN 978-0-429-82193-6.
  13. ^ Singh, Mukesh Kumar (2019-02-13). Engineered Fabrics. BoD – Books on Demand. p. 6. ISBN 978-1-78985-007-9.

Media files used on this page

MacLachlan hunting tartan (D. W. Stewart).svg
Author/Creator: , Licence: CC BY-SA 2.5
A representation of the Maclachlan hunting tartan. This tartan is the oldest tartan to bear the name MacLachlan. This tartan is referred to as the Old MacLachlan, MacLachlan, and Hunting MacLachlan. This sett was first published in Old & Rare Scottish Tartans by D. W. Stewart in 1893.
Thread count: Y6, W4, Bk32, G32, Y6, W4, R48.
Sources: MacLachlan Clan Tartan WR1710 MacLachlan Hunting Tartan
Jute nahtlos.png
Author/Creator: SoylentGreen, Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
Hessian Fabric made seamless. It will serve to create a normal map in Blender.
Batik Indonesia.jpg
Author/Creator: MartijnL, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0 nl
Batik cloth purchased in Yogyakarta, Indonesia