Cedar bark textile

Thuja plicata bark.png

Cedar bark textile was used by indigenous people in the Pacific Northwest region of modern-day Canada and the United States. Historically, most items of clothing were made of shredded and woven cedar bark.[1]

The names of the trees which provide the bark material are Thuja plicata, the Western redcedar and Callitropsis nootkatensis, or yellow cypress (often called "yellow cedar"). Bark was peeled in long strips from the trees, the outer layer was split away, and the flexible inner layer was shredded and processed. The resulting felted strips of bark were soft and could be plaited, sewn or woven into a variety of fabrics that were either dense and watertight, or soft and comfortable.[2]

Women wore skirts and capes of red cedar bark, while men wore long capes of cedar bark into which some mountain goat wool was woven for decorative effect.[3]

See also

  • Barkcloth
  • Northwest Coast art
  • Textile arts of indigenous peoples of the Americas

References

  1. ^ Stewart, Hilary (December 2009). Cedar: Tree of Life to the Northwest Coast Indians. University of Washington Press. p. 150. ISBN 978-0295974484.
  2. ^ Emmons, George Thornton (1991). The Tlingit Indians (Anthropological Papers of the American Museum of Natural History). p. 222. ISBN 9780295970080.
  3. ^ Stewart, Hilary (December 2009). Cedar: Tree of Life to the Northwest Coast Indians. University of Washington Press. p. 150. ISBN 978-0295974484.

External links


Media files used on this page

Jute nahtlos.png
Author/Creator: SoylentGreen, Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
Hessian Fabric made seamless. It will serve to create a normal map in Blender.
Batik Indonesia.jpg
Author/Creator: MartijnL, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0 nl
Batik cloth purchased in Yogyakarta, Indonesia
MacLachlan hunting tartan (D. W. Stewart).svg
Author/Creator: , Licence: CC BY-SA 2.5
A representation of the Maclachlan hunting tartan. This tartan is the oldest tartan to bear the name MacLachlan. This tartan is referred to as the Old MacLachlan, MacLachlan, and Hunting MacLachlan. This sett was first published in Old & Rare Scottish Tartans by D. W. Stewart in 1893.
Thread count: Y6, W4, Bk32, G32, Y6, W4, R48.
Sources: MacLachlan Clan Tartan WR1710 MacLachlan Hunting Tartan
Denim.jpg
Author/Creator: unknown, Licence: CC-BY-SA-3.0
Thuja plicata bark.png
(http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/9459 and http://www.gutenberg.org/files/9459/9459-h/images/ilvi09.png From Indian Legends of Vancouver Island by Carmichael, Alfred Illustrator Semeyn, J. Project Gutenberg Copyright expired)