COVID-19 vaccination in the Republic of Ireland

COVID-19 vaccination in the Republic of Ireland
COVID-19 Vaccination Centre road sign in the Republic of Ireland.png
Large vaccination centres were put in place nationwide to administer COVID-19 vaccines
Date29 December 2020–present
LocationRepublic of Ireland Republic of Ireland
CauseCOVID-19 pandemic
Organised by
Participants
  • 10,620,191[1] (doses administered)
  • 4,054,930[1] (at least one dose)
  • 3,736,467[1] (second dose)
  • 2,828,794[1] (boosters)
Outcome

95.4% of the Irish adult population (18+) have received at least one dose[2]

   


94.5% of the Irish adult population (18+) are fully vaccinated[2]

   


73.4% of the Irish adult population (18+) have received a third or booster dose[2]

   

WebsiteGov.ie – COVID-19 Vaccine

The COVID-19 vaccination programme in the Republic of Ireland is an ongoing mass immunisation campaign that began on 29 December 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the Republic of Ireland.[3][4] Ireland's vaccination rollout has been praised as one of the most successful rollouts in the world and was ranked number one in the European Union in terms of its percentage of adult population fully vaccinated,[5] and was also ranked number one in the EU for the number of booster vaccines administered.[6]

As of 3 March 2022, 10,620,191 vaccine doses have been administered, of which 4,054,930 people have received at least one dose, 3,736,467 have received their second dose and 2,828,794 have received a third or booster dose.[1]

Background

Preparations

On 1 December 2020, the Government of Ireland approved an advance purchase agreement for 875,000 doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine.[7][8][9]

On 15 December, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced the Government's National COVID-19 Vaccination Strategy, which outlined the country's high-level plan for safe, effective and efficient vaccination of the Republic of Ireland, while safeguarding continued provision of health and social care services.[10][11][12]

On 17 January 2021, the Government requested early deliveries of the Oxford–AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine as discussions to secure early delivery of the vaccine got underway.[13][14][15]

Vaccines on order

VaccineApprovalDeployment
Pfizer–BioNTechGreen check.svg 21 December 2020[16]Green check.svg 29 December 2020[17]
ModernaGreen check.svg 6 January 2021[18]Green check.svg 16 January 2021[19]
Oxford–AstraZenecaGreen check.svg 29 January 2021[20]Green check.svg 8 February 2021[21]
JanssenGreen check.svg 11 March 2021[22]Green check.svg 6 May 2021[23]
NovavaxGreen check.svg 20 December 2021[24]Green check.svg 29 January 2022[25]

COVID-19 booster campaign

The HSE announced on 24 September that immunocompromised people aged over 12 would be notified of an appointment for a third dose of COVID-19 vaccine from Wednesday 29 September, as Ireland's COVID-19 booster vaccination campaign would commence.[26] In addition, the National Immunisation Advisory Committee recommended additional vaccines be given to elderly people aged over 80 and to anyone over 65 in a long-term care facility.[27]

On 19 October, the National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC) approved vaccine boosters for people aged 60 and over.[28]

On 1 November, following new advice from NIAC, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly authorised the use of booster vaccines for healthcare staff,[29] while boosters were extended to people aged 50 to 59, those aged 16 to 59 with an underlying condition and all long-term healthcare facility residents on 16 November.[30] On 26 November, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced that booster vaccines would be offered to everyone aged 16 and over, starting with pregnant women aged over 16, those aged 40 to 49 and those aged 16 to 39, following new recommendations from NIAC.[31]

On 8 December, the NIAC recommended that COVID-19 vaccinations be offered to children aged five to 11 years.[32]

On 13 December, the NIAC recommended that people would be able to receive a booster dose three months after their second dose.[33]

On 19 December, the booster vaccination programme began for people aged 40 to 49.[34] On 23 December, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced that booster vaccines would be offered to everyone aged 30 and over from 29 December,[35] and announced on New Year's Eve that booster vaccines would be offered to all remaining age groups from 2 January 2022, eight days earlier than planned.[36]

On 21 February, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly accepted recommendations from NIAC that booster vaccines be offered to children aged 12 to 15 years.[37]

GroupProgress
People living in a nursing home or a long-term healthcare facility In progress
Frontline healthcare workers
People aged 40 and older
People aged 16 to 49 who have an underlying condition
People who are pregnant
People aged 16 to 39
People aged 12 to 15

Timeline

December 2020

Annie Lynch, a 79-year-old woman, became the first person in the Republic of Ireland to receive the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine at St. James's Hospital, Dublin on 29 December 2020,[17][38] and received the second dose three weeks later on Tuesday 19 January 2021.[39]

On St Stephen's Day, the first shipment of 10,000 Pfizer–BioNTech vaccines arrived in the country.[40][41]

Maura Byrne, a 95-year-old woman, became the first nursing home resident in the Republic of Ireland to receive the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine on 5 January 2021,[42] while Dr Eavan Muldoon, an infectious diseases consultant, became the first healthcare worker in the Mater University Hospital to receive the vaccine.[43] On the same day, Taoiseach Micheál Martin announced that up to 135,000 people would be vaccinated nationwide by the end of February 2021.[44]

January 2021

Following the approval of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine by the European Medicines Agency on 6 January 2021, Tánaiste Leo Varadkar announced that the vaccine would allow 10,000 more people in Ireland to be vaccinated per week.[45]

The rollout of the Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine in private and voluntary nursing homes began nationwide on 7 January, with 22 nursing homes of 3,000 residents and staff to be vaccinated.[46]

The first shipment of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine arrived in the Republic of Ireland on 12 January.[47]

Around 1,800 healthcare workers received the Moderna vaccine at three mass vaccination centres that opened in Dublin, Galway and Portlaoise on 16 January.[19]

February 2021

The first shipment of 21,600 AstraZeneca vaccines arrived in the country on 6 February.[48]

On 24 February, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced that Ireland had ordered enough vaccines to vaccinate 10.3 million people with 18.5 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines ordered.[49]

March 2021

On 6 March, Taoiseach Micheál Martin announced that Ireland had reached the milestone of half a million COVID-19 vaccines administered.[50]

On 10 March, Taoiseach Micheál Martin confirmed that Ireland was to receive a further 46,500 doses of the Pfizer–BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine before the end of March.[51]

On 22 March, it was announced that President Michael D. Higgins and his wife Sabina Higgins received their first doses of a COVID-19 vaccine on 19 March.[52]

April 2021

On 8 April, the CEO of the Health Service Executive (HSE) Paul Reid announced that Ireland had reached the milestone of one million COVID-19 vaccines administered.[53]

On 15 April, over 26,000 people registered for a COVID-19 vaccination after the online portal for 69-year-olds went live.[54]

On 25 April, Taoiseach Micheál Martin announced that Ireland had reached the milestone of one million first doses of COVID-19 vaccines administered.[55]

May 2021

On 9 May, Taoiseach Micheál Martin received his first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in Cork City Hall and urged people to get vaccinated to protect themselves, while a record 52,278 doses were administered on Friday 7 May.[56]

On 17 May, the National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC) confirmed that people in their 40s would be given a choice to accept the Johnson & Johnson or AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine or opt to wait for another vaccine.[57]

June 2021

On 2 June, NIAC advised that the gap between two doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine could be reduced from 12 weeks to 8 weeks.[58]

On 5 June, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly received his first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in Greystones, County Wicklow.[59]

July 2021

On 2 July, following recommendations from NIAC, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced an expansion of the vaccination rollout programme to younger people with 750 pharmacies to begin administering the Janssen vaccine to people in the 18 to 34 age group who opted in for earlier vaccination from 5 July, while vaccination centres would begin administering the AstraZeneca vaccine to the group from 12 July.[60] On 5 July, over 500 pharmacies around the country began administering the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to people aged 18 to 34 who opted-in to receive it.[61]

On 27 July, after the COVID-19 vaccine registration portal opened to people aged 16 and 17 for the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines, the Government agreed to extend the vaccination programme to those aged 12 to 15 following recommendations from the National Immunisation Advisory Committee.[62] On the evening of 11 August, the COVID-19 vaccine registration portal opened to people aged 12 to 15 for the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.[63] On 12 August, the Chief Executive of the HSE Paul Reid said the vaccination programme was in "the final leg" after more than 50,000 people aged 12 to 15 registered to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, with 90% of adults partially vaccinated and 80% fully vaccinated.[64]

August 2021

On 3 August, Taoiseach Micheál Martin announced that a deal had been completed to secure 700,000 Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines from Romania.[65]

On 18 August, Ireland received its largest ever weekly shipment of COVID-19 vaccines, with over 540,000 doses delivered to the HSE, including the first batch of unwanted vaccines from the Romanian Government.[66]

September 2021

On 1 September, under changes to the COVID-19 vaccination programme, the National Immunisation Advisory Committee recommended that pregnant women could be offered an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at any stage of pregnancy and that immunocompromised individuals aged 12 and older could receive a third additional vaccine dose.[67]

On 8 September, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced an update to Ireland's COVID-19 vaccination programme, with residents aged 65 years and older living in long term residential care facilities and people aged 80 years and older living in the community to receive a booster dose of an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine.[68] Two days later on 10 September, latest figures showed that 90% of adults in Ireland were fully vaccinated against COVID-19, while the seven-millionth dose was administered.[69] This is one of the highest levels of vaccination in the European Union.[70]

November 2021

On 25 November, the HSE began preliminary planning for offering COVID-19 vaccines to children aged 5 to 11,[71] after the European Medicines Agency (EMA) gave its approval.[72]

January 2022

On 3 January 2022, vaccine registration began for all children aged 5 to 11,[73] and vaccinations for this age group began on 8 January.[74]

Vaccine certificates

A COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card issued by the HSE in August 2021.
A COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Record Card issued by the HSE in January 2022.

The Health Service Executive (HSE) issues a vaccine record card to those receiving a COVID-19 vaccine in Ireland that provides reminders for a follow-up appointment. The card contains the recipient's name, the dates on which the two doses were administered, the name of the vaccine, and its batch number.[75] The vaccine record card, along with the EU Digital COVID Certificate, were used as proofs of vaccination in restaurants, hotels and bars to gain access to indoor hospitality,[76][77] as well as in nightclubs, indoor live entertainment, cinemas, theatres and gyms.[78] Requirements on the use of vaccine certificates domestically were scrapped in January 2022.[79]

Vaccine rollout and distribution

Vaccine priority groups

The COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Strategy currently includes 9 priority groups for the vaccine rollout in Ireland.[80]

On 23 February, following the publication of the Government's new revised Living with COVID-19 plan called "The Path Ahead", Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced an update to the COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Strategy with people aged between 16 and 69 who are at very high risk of developing severe COVID-19 moved up the priority list, after the National Public Health Emergency Team endorsed recommendations by the National Immunisation Advisory Committee.[81][82]

On 30 March, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly announced an update to the COVID-19 Vaccine Allocation Strategy with priority groups being changed to an age-based system after vulnerable people with underlying conditions were vaccinated.[83][84]

Ireland's COVID-19 vaccination programme (January–July 2021)[85]
January–MarchApril–MayMay–July
1.2.3.
  • People aged over 80
  • Frontline healthcare workers
  • People aged over 65 in long-term care facilities
  • People aged 65–79
  • People at high or very high risk
  • Key vaccination workers
  • Other vulnerable groups
  • Everyone aged 18–64
OrderPriority groupProgress
1People aged 65 years and older who are residents of long-term care facilities In progress
2Frontline healthcare workers
3People aged 70 and older
4People aged 16–69 whose medical condition puts them at very high risk of severe disease and death
5People aged 65–69 whose underlying condition puts them at a high risk of severe disease and death
6Other people aged 65–69, other healthcare workers not in direct patient contact, and key workers
7People aged 16–64 whose underlying condition puts them at high risk of severe disease and death
8Residents of long-term care facilities aged 18–64
9People aged 64 years and younger, and people aged 16–64 living or working in crowded settings
55–64 years
45–54 years
35–44 years
25–34 years
16–24 years
10
12–15 years
5–11 years

"People who have an underlying condition that puts them at high risk of severe disease and death" is defined as:[86]

Organisations involved

A High-Level Task Force on COVID-19 Vaccination was established on 11 November 2020 to oversee the roll-out of COVID-19 vaccines in the country once they were approved by the statutory authorities,[87] and to support the Department of Health and Health Service Executive (HSE) to deliver a COVID-19 immunisation programme that meets best practice and provides good governance.[88] The first full meeting of the task force took place on 23 November 2020 and was chaired by Professor Brian MacCraith.[89]

Members of the High-Level Task Force on COVID-19 Vaccination are made up of senior representatives from the Department of Health, the Health Service Executive, the Health Products Regulatory Authority, the Office of the Government Chief Information Officer, the Office of Government Procurement, IDA Ireland, the Dublin Airport Authority, the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment and the Department of the Taoiseach.[90][91][92]

The National Immunisation Advisory Committee (an independent body outside of the HSE) provides expert, evidence-based and impartial guidance about the COVID-19 vaccines to the Chief Medical Officer in the Department of Health.[93][94]

Progress to date

Vaccination status of the Irish population as of 3 March 2022

  Unvaccinated population: ~845,740 people (17.26%)
  Partially vaccinated[a]: 79,134 people (1.61%)
  Fully vaccinated: 3,975,796 people (81.13%)

Total doses administered by vaccine type as of 3 March 2022

  Pfizer–BioNTech (5,908,865) (74.49%)
  Oxford–AstraZeneca (1,204,779) (15.18%)
  Moderna (579,022) (7.29%)
  Janssen J&J (239,343) (3.01%)
Vaccinations figures (Updated weekly)[1]
Date1st dose[b]2nd dose3rd doseTotal vaccinations
31 December 20201,800+[95]
4 January 20214,000[96]
7 January 202115,314[97]
13 January 202177,303[98]
17 January 202194,000[99]
20 January 2021121,900[100]
24 January 2021143,000[101]
27 January 2021147,70013,800161,500[102]
31 January 2021150,50049,300199,800[103]
3 February 2021152,20067,000219,200
10 February 2021166,86389,818256,681
17 February 2021197,609113,291310,900
24 February 2021254,948136,407391,355
3 March 2021328,598146,047474,645
10 March 2021409,662160,729570,391
17 March 2021468,328171,258639,586
24 March 2021529,984202,694732,678
31 March 2021619,003246,457865,460
7 April 2021716,636301,6281,018,264
14 April 2021789,526331,4771,121,003
21 April 2021904,774371,0541,275,828
28 April 20211,067,378419,6651,487,043
5 May 20211,233,067467,4711,700,538
12 May–28 June 2021Figures unavailable as a result of the Health Service Executive cyberattack
29 June 20212,443,9211,593,5174,109,474
1 July 20212,482,3771,681,7844,236,206
8 July 20212,652,6571,967,1634,619,820
15 July 20212,803,4912,192,2284,995,719
22 July 20213,084,0932,353,2475,437,340
29 July 20213,272,7912,506,3095,779,100
5 August 20213,394,9452,645,0496,039,994
12 August 20213,468,7292,820,0256,288,754
19 August 20213,571,2392,965,0456,536,284
26 August 20213,649,2033,087,0146,736,217
2 September 20213,698,8493,172,5846,871,433
9 September 20213,726,8133,261,5986,988,411
16 September 20213,745,6603,343,0457,088,705
23 September 20213,759,6083,408,0677,167,675
30 September 20213,771,8083,446,9932,9497,218,801
7 October 20213,780,2363,467,36045,9477,247,596
14 October 20213,786,9423,484,258109,0457,271,200
21 October 20213,797,7283,499,515165,2717,297,243
28 October 20213,809,9153,511,230195,5717,321,145
4 November 20213,821,4863,519,855236,7237,341,341
11 November 20213,831,0123,527,177366,8817,358,189
18 November 20213,841,6073,536,838533,4847,378,445
25 November 20213,852,4153,550,852721,9837,403,267
2 December 20213,863,9483,561,959932,0647,425,907
9 December 20213,871,3913,571,6421,131,0127,443,033
16 December 20213,878,0473,581,4111,402,8668,862,324
23 December 20213,887,5773,592,9411,967,8609,448,378
30 December 20213,891,8213,598,1712,138,8629,628,854
6 January 20223,898,0343,606,5522,324,4789,829,064
13 January 20223,955,5163,614,4362,510,54910,080,501
20 January 20223,997,6053,621,4442,625,79610,244,845
27 January 20224,013,8503,629,9112,681,41210,325,173
3 February 20224,023,8073,656,0272,720,40510,400,239
9 February 20224,032,9673,682,0692,747,35810,462,394
17 February 20224,042,1643,705,1902,783,97810,531,332
24 February 20224,049,7443,725,6252,806,51610,581,885
3 March 20224,054,9303,736,4672,828,79410,620,191
Uptake by age group[104]
Age groupAdditional doseFull vaccinationAt least one doseNot vaccinated
60+ years
95.2%
100%
100%
0%
50–59 years
86.9%
99.4%
99.8%
0.2%
25–49 years
61.1%
88.9%
89.8%
10.2%
18–24 years
45.4%
86.9%
88.2%
11.8%
<18 years
5.2%
32.9%
36.6%
63.4%

Vaccination centres

Up to 40 large vaccination centres were put in place across the country to administer COVID-19 vaccines.[105]

Major facilities were put in place in Cork, Dublin, Waterford, Sligo, Galway, Limerick and Athlone, with smaller centres in Mullingar, Longford, Ennis, Nenagh, Bantry and Tralee.[106][107] Three GP-run vaccination centres were also put in place across the country, with The Helix at Dublin City University the first to be established, vaccinating 5,000 people a day.[108][109] Cork City Hall, Páirc Uí Chaoimh GAA grounds and Munster Technological University's Bishopstown campus were transformed into mass vaccination centres, administering 10,000 shots a day.[110][111]

Large venues such as sports stadia, GAA clubs, hotels, conference centres and arenas were used as mass vaccination centres across all counties in Ireland.[112][113]

Aviva Stadium vaccination centre.
Waterford IT Arena vaccination centre.
Cork City Hall vaccination centre.

Locations

On 15 February, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly confirmed locations for 37 vaccination centres across all counties as part of the country's COVID-19 vaccination programme.[114][115]

On 20 February, nearly 1,000 patients over the age of 85 received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine at the country's first mass vaccination centre at The Helix in Dublin City University.[116][117]

On 28 July, it was announced that some of the vaccination centres would allow walk-in vaccinations on certain days and times without an appointment.[118]

Location of vaccination centres in the Republic of Ireland
CentreCounty
Carlow ITCarlow
Kilmore HotelCavan
West County Hotel, EnnisClare
Bantry Primary Care CentreCork
City Hall, CorkCork
Páirc Uí ChaoimhCork
Clonakilty GAA ClubCork
MTU Cork, BishopstownCork
Mallow GAA ClubCork
Letterkenny ITDonegal
Aviva StadiumDublin
Citywest Convention CentreDublin
Croke ParkDublin
The Helix, DCU (until July 2021)Dublin
National Show Centre, Swords (from July 2021)
Ballybrit RacecourseGalway
MTU Kerry, TraleeKerry
Killarney Sports & Leisure CentreKerry
Punchestown RacecourseKildare
Cillin Hill Conference CentreKilkenny
Midlands Park Hotel, PortlaoiseLaois
Primary Care Unit, Carrick-on-ShannonLeitrim
Radisson Hotel (until July 2021)Limerick
Limerick Racecourse (from July 2021)
Clonguish GAA Club, NewtownforbesLongford
Fairways Hotel, DundalkLouth
Simonstown Gaels GAA Club, NavanMeath
Breaffy House Resort, CastlebarMayo
Hillgrove HotelMonaghan
Tullamore Court HotelOffaly
Abbey HotelRoscommon
Sligo ITSligo
Abbeycourt Hotel, NenaghTipperary
Clonmel Park HotelTipperary
Waterford IT ArenaWaterford
Athlone IT Arena (until September 2021)Westmeath
Moate Community Centre (from September 2021)
Bloomfield House Hotel, Mullingar (until September 2021)Westmeath
Riverside Hotel, Enniscorthy (until July 2021)Wexford
Astro Active Centre, Enniscorthy (from July 2021)
Kilanerin Community Centre, Gorey (from June 2021)Wexford
Arklow Bay Hotel (until June 2021)Wicklow
Shoreline Leisure Centre, GreystonesWicklow

Issues and controversies

A protest against COVID-19 vaccination in Dublin

Adverse events

On 14 March, the administration of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine was suspended in Ireland by the National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC) as a precautionary measure following concerns over serious blood clots in Norway.[119][120] On 19 March, the NIAC recommended that the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine could continue to be used in Ireland following approval from the European Medicines Agency (EMA) on 18 March.[121][122]

On 8 April, the Health Products Regulatory Authority (HPRA) began an investigation after the first case of a very rare blood clot in the brain of a person after vaccination with the AstraZeneca vaccine was confirmed in a 40-year-old Dublin woman.[123][124]

On 12 April, following a lengthy meeting, the National Immunisation Advisory Committee (NIAC) recommend that only people over 60 years of age should get the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine and that a second dose of the vaccine should not be given to anyone who developed unusual blood clots with low platelets after the first dose.[125][126]

Hospitals

On 26 March 2021, the Labour Party leader Alan Kelly called for the chief executive of the Beacon Hospital to resign after it gave 20 leftover COVID-19 vaccines to a number of teachers and staff at a private secondary school in Bray, County Wicklow on 23 March.[127][128] One day later on 27 March, Minister for Health Stephen Donnelly requested the Health Service Executive (HSE) to suspend vaccine operations at the Beacon Hospital following the controversy.[129] On 19 July, four months after the controversy, an independent report found that the decision by the hospital to provide vaccines to 20 teachers at the Bray school was incorrect, but was made in good faith.[130]

On 1 April, an independent review of the COVID-19 vaccination programme at the Coombe Hospital found that a consultant brought two leftover vaccine doses home to administer them to two family members.[131][132]

Opposition to age-based overhaul of vaccines

On 30 March, a decision by the Government to overhaul the allocation of COVID-19 vaccines to an age-based system sparked anger and concern among teachers' unions and key workers.[133] The new change meant that key workers in essential jobs and the education sector who couldn't avoid a high risk of exposure to the virus would lose vaccine prioritisation.[134] Ireland's largest teaching union, the Irish National Teachers' Organisation (INTO), strongly criticised moves to change the vaccination rollout plan stating it was "extremely concerned" by the news, while the Teachers' Union of Ireland (TUI) echoed concerns and called for urgent engagement with the Department of Education.[135] The Association of Secondary Teachers, Ireland (ASTI) stated it was "shocked and dismayed" by the changes and claimed the decision was "totally at odds" with the objective to keep schools open, while the president of the Garda Representative Association (GRA) described the change as "a sucker punch" to their members, and that the decision "downgraded" the work of Gardaí and disregarded the risks they took while policing the pandemic.[136] On 7 April, the three teacher unions voted for an emergency motion backing industrial action, up to and including strike action, if they were not prioritised for vaccination.[137][138]

Health Service Executive ransomware attack

On 14 May, the COVID-19 vaccination registration portal was made offline after the Health Service Executive (HSE) shut down all of its IT systems after a major ransomware attack, but was later restored in the evening.[139][140]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Partially vaccinated means having received only one dose of a two-dose vaccine.
  2. ^ Includes the single-dose Janssen vaccine

References

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Media files used on this page

Flag of Ireland.svg
Note that the green portion of the flag was designed to represent the majority Catholic residents of the island, the orange side the minority Protestant and the white middle part peace and harmony between them.
Coronavirus. SARS-CoV-2.png
Author/Creator: Alexey Solodovnikov (Idea, Producer, CG, Editor), Valeria Arkhipova (Scientific Сonsultant), Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Scientifically accurate atomic model of the external structure of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a strain (genetic variant) of the coronavirus that caused Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), first identified in Wuhan, China, during December 2019

Each separate locus (amorphous blob) is an atom of:

  cobalt: membrane
  crimson: E protein
  green: M protein
  orange: glucose (glycan)
  turquoise : S (spike) glycoprotein
SARS-CoV-2 (Wikimedia colors).svg
Author/Creator: Geraki, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
SARS-CoV-2 logo in Wikimedia colors
Green check.svg
Green check icon
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Shiny yellow button/marker widget. Used to mark the location on a map.
COVID-19 Vaccination Centre road sign in the Republic of Ireland.png
Author/Creator: Ear-phone, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
COVID-19 Vaccination Centre road sign in the Republic of Ireland
HSE COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card.jpg
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HSE COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card
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Waterford Institute of Technology, 2021-06-01
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A protest against COVID-19 vaccines in Dublin, Ireland, in November 2021.
Island of Ireland relief location map.png
Author/Creator: Nilfanion, Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0

Relief map of Ireland

Equirectangular map projection on WGS 84 datum, with N/S stretched 170%

Geographic limits:

  • West: 11.0° W
  • East: 5.0° W
  • North: 55.6° N
  • South: 51.2° N
Cork City Hall, February 2018.jpg
Author/Creator: Dylan, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Cork City Hall
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Shiny pink button/marker widget. Used to mark the location of something such as a tourist attraction.
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Aviva Stadium (Dublin Arena) with River Dodder in foreground. Photo taken from Fitzwilliam Quay.
HSE COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Record Card.jpg
Author/Creator: Ear-phone, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
Health Service Executive COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Record Card