2002 South Carolina gubernatorial election

2002 South Carolina gubernatorial election

November 5, 2002
 Mark Sanford, Official Portrait, 113th Congress (cropped).jpgPortrait of Jim Hodges.jpg
NomineeMark SanfordJim Hodges
PartyRepublicanDemocratic
Popular vote585,422521,140
Percentage52.9%47.0%

South Carolina Governor Election Results by County, 2002.svg
County results
Sanford:      50–60%      60–70%
Hodges:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

Governor before election

Jim Hodges
Democratic

Elected Governor

Mark Sanford
Republican

The 2002 South Carolina gubernatorial election was held on November 5, 2002 to select the governor of the state of South Carolina. Mark Sanford, the Republican nominee, beat incumbent Democratic Governor Jim Hodges to become the 115th governor of South Carolina. Hodges became only the third incumbent governor in South Carolina history to lose reelection.

Democratic primary

Governor Jim Hodges faced no opposition from South Carolina Democrats and avoided a primary election.

Republican primary

The South Carolina Republican Party held their primary on June 11, 2002 and the runoff on June 25, 2002. The contest became a race between Lieutenant Governor Bob Peeler from the Upstate and Mark Sanford, a former representative of the 1st congressional district in the Lowcountry. Sanford received the support of the candidates eliminated from the runoff election and easily defeated Peeler.

Republican primary results[1]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mark Sanford 122,143 38.62
Republican Bob Peeler 119,026 37.64
RepublicanCharlie Condon49,46915.64
RepublicanKen Wingate12,3663.91
RepublicanJim Miles8,5662.71
RepublicanReb Sutherland2,7700.88
RepublicanBill Branton1,9150.61
Total votes316,255 100
Republican primary runoff results [2]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Republican Mark Sanford 183,820 60.13
RepublicanBob Peeler121,88139.87
Total votes305,701 100

General election

Predictions

SourceRankingAs of
The Cook Political Report[3]TossupOctober 31, 2002
Sabato's Crystal Ball[4]Lean R (flip)November 4, 2002

Polling

Poll sourceDate(s)
administered
Sample
size[a]
Margin
of error
Jim
Hodges (D)
Mark
Sanford (R)
Other /
Undecided
SurveyUSANovember 1–3, 2002764 (LV)± 3.6%52%46%2%

The general election was held on November 5, 2002 and Mark Sanford was elected as the next governor of South Carolina. Turnout was higher than the previous gubernatorial election because of the competitive nature of the race between the two parties.

South Carolina Gubernatorial Election, 2002
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanMark Sanford 585,422 52.9 +7.6
DemocraticJim Hodges (incumbent)521,14047.0-6.3
Write-in1,1630.1-0.1
Majority64,2825.9-2.1
Turnout1,107,72554.1+1.1
Republican gain from Democratic
2002 South Carolina gubernatorial election map, by percentile by county.
  65+% won by Sanford
  60%-64% won by Sanford
  55%-59% won by Sanford
  50%-54% won by Sanford
  50%-54% won by Hodges
  55%-59% won by Hodges
  60%-64% won by Hodges
  65+% won by Hodges

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Key:
    A – all adults
    RV – registered voters
    LV – likely voters
    V – unclear

References

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-11-03. Retrieved 2010-10-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-11-03. Retrieved 2010-10-31.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Governor Updated October 31, 2002 | The Cook Political Report". The Cook Political Report. October 31, 2002. Archived from the original on December 8, 2002. Retrieved September 18, 2018.
  4. ^ "Governors Races". www.centerforpolitics.org. November 4, 2002. Archived from the original on December 12, 2002. Retrieved September 18, 2018.

External links

Preceded by
1998
South Carolina gubernatorial electionsSucceeded by
2006


Media files used on this page

Portrait of Jim Hodges.jpg
Author/Creator:

Harris & Ewing.

Photo scanned by South Carolina Political Collections at the University of South Carolina, Licence: CC BY-SA 4.0
A color portrait of South Carolina Governor Jim Hodges, cropped from a larger, signed portrait.